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tsuomela : construal-level-theory   10

Overcoming Bias : Far Truth Is For Extremes
"So assuming you actually have a viable choice, the situations where it makes sense to reject religion in favor of far truth are extreme – either there are big personally-useful far contrarian claims to learn, or you have a good shot at being a rare far expert, respected by a community with truth-correlated standards. So if such extremes seem unlikely to you, far truth probably isn’t worth its costs to you."
religion  belief  construal-level-theory  near-far  truth  benefits  psychology  atheism 
may 2012 by tsuomela
Experimental Philosophy and the Problem of Free Will
"Many philosophical problems are rooted in everyday thought, and experimental philosophy uses social scientific techniques to study the psychological underpinnings of such problems. In the case of free will, research suggests that people in a diverse range of cultures reject determinism, but people give conflicting responses on whether determinism would undermine moral responsibility. When presented with abstract questions, people tend to maintain that determinism would undermine responsibility, but when presented with concrete cases of wrongdoing, people tend to say that determinism is consistent with moral responsibility. It remains unclear why people reject determinism and what drives people’s conflicted attitudes about responsibility. Experimental philosophy aims to address these issues and thereby illuminate the philosophical problem of free will. "
philosophy  experimental  free-will  freedom  near-far  construal-level-theory  choice  judgment  morality  ethics  abstraction 
march 2011 by tsuomela
Why Love Has Wings and Sex Has Not: How Reminders of Love and Sex Influence Creative and Analytic Thinking -- Förster et al. 35 (11): 1479 -- Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
This article examines cognitive links between romantic love and creativity and between sexual desire and analytic thought based on construal level theory. It suggests that when in love, people typically focus on a long-term perspective, which should enhance holistic thinking and thereby creative thought, whereas when experiencing sexual encounters, they focus on the present and on concrete details enhancing analytic thinking. Because people automatically activate these processing styles when in love or when they experience sex, subtle or even unconscious reminders of love versus sex should suffice to change processing modes. Two studies explicitly or subtly reminded participants of situations of love or sex and found support for this hypothesis.
love  psychology  creativity  construal-level-theory  distance  perception 
october 2009 by tsuomela
Does Falling in Love Make Us More Creative?: Scientific American
The clever experiments demonstrated that love makes us think differently in that it triggers global processing, which in turn promotes creative thinking and interferes with analytic thinking. Thinking about sex, however, has the opposite effect: it triggers local processing, which in turn promotes analytic thinking and interferes with creativity.
psychology  creativity  innovation  love  sex  construal-level-theory  perspective  scale  distance  art 
october 2009 by tsuomela
The Benefits of Vacation - The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
The reason such travels are useful involves a quirk of cognition, in which problems that feel “close" - and the closeness can be physical, temporal or even emotional - get contemplated in a more concrete manner. (This is known as construal level theory.) As a result, when we think about things that are nearby, our thoughts are delicately constricted, bound by a more limited set of associations. While this habit can be helpful -it allows us to focus on the facts at hand - it also inhibits our imagination.
psychology  bias  travel  imagination  construal-level-theory  distance  mental  vacation  cognition  science  creativity 
september 2009 by tsuomela

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