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Unnamed and Unsurveilled | Tom Thor Buchanan
"An Internet for the People: The Politics and Promise of craigslist by Jessa Lingel. Princeton University Press, 208 pages."
book  review  internet  business-model  culture 
yesterday by tsuomela
Back to the Future by Peter Thiel | Articles | First Things
"The Decadent Society: How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success by ross douthat avid, 272 pages, $27"
book  review  futures  culture  declension-narrative  decadence 
5 days ago by tsuomela
The Tragedy of the Yale Commons | The New Republic
"How private equity baron Stephen Schwarzman has steamrolled our civic culture"
school(Yale)  finance  civic  culture 
9 weeks ago by tsuomela
The New Tech Culture Wars | Dissent Magazine
"In our extremely online political times, content moderators have been cast as central players in the fight for democracy, whether as its antagonists or its delinquent guardians."
books  review  social-media  culture 
12 weeks ago by tsuomela
In praise of cultural elitism | The Spectator
"We have become so tolerant of each other’s taste that taste no longer matters."
culture  crticism  reviews  taste  aesthetics 
september 2019 by tsuomela
Radiation Nation | Columbia University Press
"On March 28, 1979, the worst nuclear reactor accident in U.S. history occurred at the Three Mile Island power plant in Central Pennsylvania. Radiation Nation tells the story of what happened that day and in the months and years that followed, as local residents tried to make sense of the emergency. The near-meltdown occurred at a pivotal moment when the New Deal coalition was unraveling, trust in government was eroding, conservatives were consolidating their power, and the political left was becoming marginalized. Using the accident to explore this turning point, Natasha Zaretsky provides a fresh interpretation of the era by disclosing how atomic and ecological imaginaries shaped the conservative ascendancy. Drawing on the testimony of the men and women who lived in the shadow of the reactor, Radiation Nation shows that the region's citizens, especially its mothers, grew convinced that they had sustained radiological injuries that threatened their reproductive futures. Taking inspiration from the antiwar, environmental, and feminist movements, women at Three Mile Island crafted a homegrown ecological politics that wove together concerns over radiological threats to the body, the struggle over abortion and reproductive rights, and eroding trust in authority. This politics was shaped above all by what Zaretsky calls "biotic nationalism," a new body-centered nationalism that imagined the nation as a living, mortal being and portrayed sickened Americans as evidence of betrayal. The first cultural history of the accident, Radiation Nation reveals the surprising ecological dimensions of post-Vietnam conservatism while showing how growing anxieties surrounding bodily illness infused the political realignment of the 1970s in ways that blurred any easy distinction between left and right."
book  publisher  nuclear  energy  disaster  culture  1970s  history 
august 2019 by tsuomela
Virtue and Vice in an Age of Addiction | The American Conservative
"The Age of Addiction: How Bad Habits Became Big Business, David T. Courtwright, Belknap Press, 336 pages Addicted to Lust: Pornography in the Lives of Conservative Protestants, Samuel L. Perry, Oxford University Press, 288 pages"
books  review  addiction  capitalism  culture  pornography  religion 
july 2019 by tsuomela
First Men and Original Sins - Image Journal
"Faith and the American Space Program Kendrick Oliver. To Touch the Face of God: The Sacred, the Profane, and the American Space Program, 1957–1975. Johns Hopkins, 2013. Catherine L. Newell. Destined for the Stars: Faith, Future, and America’s Final Frontier. Pittsburgh, 2019. First Man. Directed by Damien Chazelle. Universal/Amblin/DreamWorks, 2018."
books  review  space  religion  history  culture  experience  grief  faith 
july 2019 by tsuomela
The Scholar's Stage: Tradition is Smarter Than You Are
"One the clearest presentations of his ideas is in his 2016 book The Secret of Our Success. The book is less a heavy scholarly tome than a poppified version of Henrich's research, but Henrich's decision to trade theoretical detail for accessibility is understandable"
book  review  culture  evolution  tradition 
june 2019 by tsuomela
Book Review: The Secret Of Our Success | Slate Star Codex
"“Culture is the secret of humanity’s success” sounds like the most vapid possible thesis. The Secret Of Our Success by anthropologist Joseph Henrich manages to be an amazing book anyway."
book  review  culture  evolution  rationality  rationalism 
june 2019 by tsuomela
The Value of W, or, Interdisciplinary Engagements on Culture - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind By Kevin Laland Published 03.07.2017 Princeton University Press 464 Pages"
book  review  culture  evolution  biology  humanism  interdisciplinary 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Habeas Data » Melville House Books
"Habeas Data shows how the explosive growth of surveillance technology has outpaced our understanding of the ethics, mores, and laws of privacy. Award-winning tech reporter Cyrus Farivar makes the case by taking ten historic court decisions that defined our privacy rights and matching them against the capabilities of modern technology. It’s an approach that combines the charge of a legal thriller with the shock of the daily headlines. Chapters include: the 1960s prosecution of a bookie that established the “reasonable expectation of privacy” in nonpublic places beyond your home (but how does that ruling apply now, when police can chart your every move and hear your every conversation within your own home — without even having to enter it?); the 1970s case where the police monitored a lewd caller — the decision of which is now the linchpin of the NSA’s controversial metadata tracking program revealed by Edward Snowden; and a 2010 low-level burglary trial that revealed police had tracked a defendant’s past 12,898 locations before arrest — an invasion of privacy grossly out of proportion to the alleged crime, which showed how authorities are all too willing to take advantage of the ludicrous gap between the slow pace of legal reform and the rapid transformation of technology."
book  publisher  surveillance  big-data  computer  culture 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Matters of Care — University of Minnesota Press
"Matters of Care presents a powerful challenge to conventional notions of care, exploring its significance as an ethical and political obligation for thinking in the more than human worlds of technoscience and naturecultures. A singular contribution to an emerging interdisciplinary debate, it expands agency beyond the human to ask how our understandings of care must shift if we broaden the world. "
book  publisher  ethics-of-care  care-work  nature  culture 
july 2018 by tsuomela
Coming Apart? Cultural Distances in the United States over Time
"We analyze temporal trends in cultural distance between groups in the US defined by income, education, gender, race, and political ideology. We measure cultural distance between two groups as the ability to infer an individual's group based on his or her (i) media consumption, (ii) consumer behavior, (iii) time use, or (iv) social attitudes. Gender difference in time use decreased between 1965 and 1995 and has remained constant since. Differences in social attitudes by political ideology and income have increased over the last four decades. Whites and non-whites have converged somewhat on attitudes but have diverged in consumer behavior. For all other demographic divisions and cultural dimensions, cultural distance has been broadly constant over time."
american-studies  america  culture  culture-war  class  partisanship 
july 2018 by tsuomela
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