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tsuomela : deception   21

Simon Johnson: The Federal Reserve and the Libor Scandal - NYTimes.com
Let’s hope he is starting to see issues in the financial sector more clearly: Too big to fail is too big to exist – or to behave in accordance with the law. This is a problem of vast, nontransparent and dangerous government subsidies
economics  banking  finance  crisis  law  deception  corruption 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Creationism requires a global conspiracy of lying scientists and/or a lying God
"To believe in creationism, either you must believe that there is a global conspiracy of scientists intent on lying to you, or you must believe that God is intent on lying to you.

That 46 percent of Americans believe one or the other of those is, as I said, dismaying."
evolution  belief  religion  creationism  conspiracy  deception 
june 2012 by tsuomela
Inside the GOP's Fact-Free Nation | Mother Jones
"Sure, there will always be liars in positions of influence—that's stipulated, as the lawyers say. And the media, God knows, have never been ideal watchdogs—the battleships that crossed the seas to avenge the sinking of the Maine attest to that. What's new is the way the liars and their enablers now work hand in glove. That I call a mendocracy, and it is the regime that governs us now."
politics  media  history  media-reform  lying  objectivity  balance  ideology  1970s  conservatism  republicans  deception  propaganda 
april 2011 by tsuomela
John J. Mearsheimer’s “Why Leaders Lie” - The Washington Post
"John J. Mearsheimer would disagree. The University of Chicago political scientist argues that the leaders most likely to lie are precisely those in Western democracies, those whose traditions of democracy perversely push them to mislead the very public that elected them. In fact, Mearsheimer says, leaders tend to lie to their own citizens more often than they lie to each other.

In his disheartening yet fascinating book, “Why Leaders Lie,” Mearsheimer offers a treatise on the biggest of big fat lies, breaking down the deceptions the world’s presidents and generals and strongmen engage in — when, why and how they lie, and how effective those falsehoods can be."
political-science  lying  leadership  politics  history  deception  deceit 
april 2011 by tsuomela
Subjective Validation « You Are Not So Smart
The tendency to believe vague statements designed to appeal to just about anyone is called the Forer Effect, and psychologists point to this phenomenon to explain why people fall for pseudoscience like biorhythms, iridology and phrenology or mysticism like astrology, numerology and tarot cards.

The Forer Effect is part of larger phenomenon psychologists refer to as subjective validation, which is a fancy way of saying you are far more vulnerable to suggestion when the subject of the conversation is you.
psychology  belief  bias  cognition  personality  horoscope  cold-reading  deceit  deception  validation  subjectivity  personal  persuasion 
july 2010 by tsuomela

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