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tsuomela : demography   45

IPUMS CPS
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
data-sources  population  demography 
january 2017 by tsuomela
Explaining Nationalist Political Views: The Case of Donald Trump by Jonathan T. Rothwell :: SSRN
"The 2016 US presidential nominee Donald Trump has broken with the policies of previous Republican Party presidents on trade, immigration, and war, in favor of a more nationalist and populist platform. Using detailed Gallup survey data for a large number of American adults, I analyze the individual and geographic factors that predict a higher probability of viewing Trump favorably and contrast the results with those found for other candidates. The results show mixed evidence that economic distress has motivated Trump support. His supporters are less educated and more likely to work in blue collar occupations, but they earn relative high household incomes, and living in areas more exposed to trade or immigration does not increase Trump support. There is stronger evidence that racial isolation and less strictly economic measures of social status, namely health and intergenerational mobility, are robustly predictive of more favorable views toward Trump, and these factors predict support for him but not other Republican presidential candidates."
politics  america  campaign  2016  race  privilege  resentment  power  demography  economics  polling 
august 2016 by tsuomela
Human population reduction is not a quick fix for environmental problems
"The planet’s large, growing, and overconsuming human population, especially the increasing affluent component, is rapidly eroding many of the Earth’s natural ecosystems. However, society’s only real policy lever to reduce the human population humanely is to encourage lower per capita fertility. How long might fertility reduction take to make a meaningful impact? We examined various scenarios for global human population change to the year 2100 by adjusting fertility and mortality rates (both chronic and short-term interventions) to determine the plausible range of outcomes. Even one-child policies imposed worldwide and catastrophic mortality events would still likely result in 5–10 billion people by 2100. Because of this demographic momentum, there are no easy ways to change the broad trends of human population size this century."
population  world  growth  future  demography  disaster  catastrophe 
november 2014 by tsuomela
World population stabilization unlikely this century
"The United Nations (UN) recently released population projections based on data until 2012 and a Bayesian probabilistic methodology. Analysis of these data reveals that, contrary to previous literature, the world population is unlikely to stop growing this century. There is an 80% probability that world population, now 7.2 billion people, will increase to between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion in 2100. This uncertainty is much smaller than the range from the traditional UN high and low variants. Much of the increase is expected to happen in Africa, in part due to higher fertility rates and a recent slowdown in the pace of fertility decline. Also, the ratio of working-age people to older people is likely to decline substantially in all countries, even those that currently have young populations."
population  world  growth  future  demography 
november 2014 by tsuomela
Facebook’s Categorial Imperative | TechCrunch
"Facebook’s newest feature adds some much-needed relevance to the huge proportion of its data hoard that no user has seen or, if we’re honest, thought about, in days, weeks, or years. But Graph Search is ultimately nothing more than a handy sorting algorithm, and it’s indicative of the fact that really, Facebook doesn’t understand the first thing about us."
facebook  social-networking  search  demography  perception  social 
january 2013 by tsuomela
The generation game — Crooked Timber
"A combination of circumstances in the late 1950s and the 1960s created a generational moment for those who were young in that blissful false dawn. For that brief moment, the distinction between the young and the old seemed fundamentally important. Generational cliches took root and have become part of our culture, but they have outlived their usefulness. The winners and losers in a world of globalisation, attacks on the welfare state and resurgent market forces cannot be neatly parcelled into age groups, however often commentators on both sides of the debate attempt it."
generational-analysis  generation  history  culture  demography 
september 2012 by tsuomela
UnderstandingSociety: Small cities
"A recent post on the suburbs closed with the observation that there is an important "other" social space in the United States beyond the categories of urban, rural, and suburban. These are the small cities throughout the United States where a significant number of people come to maturity and develop their families and careers. I speculated that perhaps there is a distinctive sociology associated with these lesser urban places. Here I will look into this question a bit more fully."
suburbia  urban  design  architecture  population  demography  sociology  experience  metropolitan-area 
september 2011 by tsuomela
Living Longer Comes With a Physical Cost - NYTimes.com
"As a result, a 20-year-old man today can expect to live about a year longer than a 20-year-old in 1998, but will spend 1.2 years more with a disease, and 2 more years unable to function normally."
age  longevity  demography  health  medicine  cost 
december 2010 by tsuomela
National Journal Magazine - The Gray And The Brown: The Generational Mismatch
Although cultural disputes often generate the most heat, government budgets are likely to become the central point of conflict between younger minorities and older whites. At the state level, where governors are grappling with persistent deficits, the strains revolve around the choice between raising taxes or cutting spending. At the national level, Congress faces not only that familiar debate but also the competition between investing in education and other programs that benefit children, or spending on those that benefit seniors, primarily Medicare and Social Security.
politics  age  generation  generational-analysis  minorities  race  education  retirement  demography  population  future 
july 2010 by tsuomela
The 10 Percent Solution to Urban Growth | Newgeography.com
The way to do this is to adopt the “10 percent solution”. That is, for most cities, they should develop a strategy that tries to capture somewhere between 5 and 15 percent of the net new growth in their metro areas. If a city can get more, great. But for any growing region, even 10 percent would create a dynamic of massive change in the urban core.
urbanism  urban  city  design  demography  suburbia 
march 2010 by tsuomela
The Changing Face of Labor, 1983-2008 - CEPR
Over the last quarter century, the unionized workforce has changed dramatically, according to this new CEPR report. In 2008, union workers reflected trends in the workforce as a whole toward a greater share of women, Latinos, Asian Pacific Americans, older, more-educated workers, and a shift out of manufacturing toward services.
unions  labor  demography  survey 
november 2009 by tsuomela
Closing The Book On The Bush Legacy - The Atlantic Politics Channel
On every major measurement, the Census Bureau report shows that the country lost ground during Bush's two terms. While Bush was in office, the median household income declined, poverty increased, childhood poverty increased even more, and the number of Americans without health insurance spiked. By contrast, the country's condition improved on each of those measures during Bill Clinton's two terms, often substantially.
politics  republicans  poverty  census  economics  demography  money  income  lost-decade 
september 2009 by tsuomela
CDC - Products - Publications and Products Descriptions
Vital Statistics of the United States, Health E-stats, Life Tables, and more from the CDC
statistics  government  data-sources  data  health  lifespan  mortality  population  demography 
august 2009 by tsuomela
The Tipping Point: Fascinating but mythological? | vox - Research-based policy analysis and commentary from leading economists
Tipping point stories are fascinating, but do we observe them in the real world? I became intrigued with this question a while ago and eventually published a paper testing the predictions of the tipping point story for its original application – racial segregation of US neighbourhoods
metaphor  model  economics  sociology  demography  urban  race 
july 2009 by tsuomela
Late Pleistocene Demography and the Appearance of Modern Human Behavior -- Powell et al. 324 (5932): 1298 -- Science
The origins of modern human behavior are marked by increased symbolic and technological complexity in the archaeological record. In western Eurasia this transition, the Upper Paleolithic, occurred about 45,000 years ago, but many of its features appear transiently in southern Africa about 45,000 years earlier. We show that demography is a major determinant in the maintenance of cultural complexity and that variation in regional subpopulation density and/or migratory activity results in spatial structuring of cultural skill accumulation. Genetic estimates of regional population size over time show that densities in early Upper Paleolithic Europe were similar to those in sub-Saharan Africa when modern behavior first appeared. Demographic factors can thus explain geographic variation in the timing of the first appearance of modern behavior without invoking increased cognitive capacity.
anthropology  archaeology  human-activity  cultural-development  history  culture  behavior  human  demography  networks  pleistocene  ancient 
july 2009 by tsuomela
The middle-age, middle-income squeeze - MIT News Office
Dramatic shifts in the U.S. labor market in the last 25 years are relegating older workers -- even those with a college education -- to lower-wage jobs, according to a research paper by MIT Economics Professor David Autor.
economics  work  job  age  demography  labor  retirement 
march 2009 by tsuomela
Pew Research Center: American Mobility: Movers, Stayers, Places and Reasons
As a nation, the United States is often portrayed as restless and rootless. Census data, though, indicate that Americans are settling down. Only 11.9% of Americans changed residences between 2007 and 2008, the smallest share since the government began tracking this trend in the late 1940s.
demography  america  movement  location  geography  history  statistics  survey  income  income-distribution 
january 2009 by tsuomela
Federal Reserve Bank: Survey of Consumer Finances
The Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) is a triennial survey of the balance sheet, pension, income, and other demographic characteristics of U.S. families. The survey also gathers information on the use of financial institutions. The links to the surveys provide summary results, codebooks and other documentation, and the publicly available data.
government  data  economics  survey  income  demography  america  federal  consumption  behavior  money 
december 2008 by tsuomela

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