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tsuomela : diseases   23

Harper, K.: The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power—a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition. Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague. A poignant reflection on humanity’s intimate relationship with the environment, The Fate of Rome provides a sweeping account of how one of history’s greatest civilizations encountered and endured, yet ultimately succumbed to the cumulative burden of nature’s violence. The example of Rome is a timely reminder that climate change and germ evolution have shaped the world we inhabit—in ways that are surprising and profound."
book  publisher  classics  roman  empire  history  diseases  climate 
october 2017 by tsuomela
Flu Near You | HealthMap
"Flu Near You is a site administered by Healthmap of Boston Children’s Hospital in partnership with the American Public Health Association and the Skoll Global Threats Fund. Flu Near You is open to anyone for browsing. Any individual living in the United States or Canada, 13 years of age or older, can register to complete brief, weekly surveys that help all of us learn more about the flu. This effort is supported with private funds to demonstrate its utility for multiple sectors who must work together for pandemic preparedness if data is openly shared. The information on the site will be available to public health officials, researchers, disaster planning organizations and anyone else who may find this information useful."
influenza  diseases  monitor  epidemiology  season  google  crowdsourcing  health 
september 2014 by tsuomela
Threatened pandemics and laboratory escapes: Self-fulfilling prophecies | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
"Looking at the problem pragmatically, the question is not if such escapes will result in a major civilian outbreak, but rather what the pathogen will be and how such an escape may be contained, if indeed it can be contained at al"
pandemic  epidemics  diseases  bioscience  safety  risk  lab  biology 
april 2014 by tsuomela
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"According to the ‘hygiene hypothesis’, the decreasing incidence of infections in western countries and more recently in developing countries is at the origin of the increasing incidence of both autoimmune and allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis is based upon epidemiological data, particularly migration studies, showing that subjects migrating from a low-incidence to a high-incidence country acquire the immune disorders with a high incidence at the first generation. However, these data and others showing a correlation between high disease incidence and high socio-economic level do not prove a causal link between infections and immune disorders. Proof of principle of the hygiene hypothesis is brought by animal models and to a lesser degree by intervention trials in humans. Underlying mechanisms are multiple and complex. They include decreased consumption of homeostatic factors and immunoregulation, involving various regulatory T cell subsets and Toll-like receptor stimulation. These mechanisms could originate, to some extent, from changes in microbiota caused by changes in lifestyle, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Taken together, these data open new therapeutic perspectives in the prevention of autoimmune and allergic diseases."
health  medicine  allergies  immunology  diseases 
september 2013 by tsuomela
Game on! UCLA researchers use online crowd-sourcing to diagnose malaria / UCLA Newsroom
"Working on the assumption that large groups of public non-experts can be trained to recognize infectious diseases with the accuracy of trained pathologists, researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have created a crowd-sourced online gaming system in which players distinguish malaria-infected red blood cells from healthy ones by viewing digital images obtained from microscopes."
crowdsourcing  medicine  health  diseases  diagnosis  citizen-science  distributed 
may 2012 by tsuomela
HealthMap | Global Health, Local Knowledge
HealthMap, a team of researchers, epidemiologists and software developers at Children's Hospital Boston founded in 2006, is an established global leader in utilizing online informal sources for disease outbreak monitoring and real-time surveillance of emerging public health threats. The freely available Web site 'healthmap.org' and mobile app 'Outbreaks Near Me' deliver real-time intelligence on a broad range of emerging infectious diseases for a diverse audience including libraries, local health departments, governments, and international travelers. HealthMap brings together disparate data sources, including online news aggregators, eyewitness reports, expert-curated discussions and validated official reports, to achieve a unified and comprehensive view of the current global state of infectious diseases and their effect on human and animal health. Through an automated process, updating 24/7/365, the system monitors, organizes, integrates, filters, visualizes and disseminates online information about emerging diseases in nine languages, facilitating early detection of global public health threats.
health  maps  disease  mashup  health-care  medicine  data-curation  diseases 
march 2012 by tsuomela
A germ of an idea - The University of Chicago Magazine: Features
In 1976 McNeill forged that path with a sweeping book that took a new approach to disease history. Plagues and Peoples (Anchor Press/Doubleday) focused a biological lens on the ebb and flow of human civilization, from prehistory into the 20th century, and the picture that emerged showed a pattern of what he calls "fateful encounters" between infectious disease and world events: China's ancient Han Dynasty, like the Roman Empire, was brought down in part by epidemic illness, McNeill argues, and during the 14th century the Black Death proved a similarly "shattering experience" for the Mongol Empire. Only by taking disease into account can one explain Athens's failure to defeat Sparta during the Peloponnesian War, a conflict that transformed the ancient Greek world.
profile  history  diseases 
october 2010 by tsuomela
BioCaster Global Health Monitor
Based on a combination of text mining algoithms, BioCaster aims to provide an early warning monitoring station for epidemic and environmental diseases (human, animal and plant). It does this by aggregating online news reports, processing them automatically using human language technology and trying to spot unusual trends. For example, the trend spotting algorithm we use on the top page is CDC's Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) C2 algorithm. Being able to spot unusual health events still requires skilled human analysts for risk assessment and verification. Automated methods like BioCaster try to make human tasks easier by providing intelligently filtered news.

BioCaster started in 2006 and provides a demonstration portal for public health workers, clinicians and researchers. The portal is currently under development at the National Institute of Informatics, Japan
diseases  machine-learning  data-mining  pandemic  health  monitor  global  natural-language-processing 
april 2010 by tsuomela
Night - The New York Review of Books
I suffer from a motor neuron disorder, in my case a variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): Lou Gehrig's disease.
biography  experience  disability  neurology  diseases  health  essay  autobiography 
january 2010 by tsuomela
Scientists Make First Map Of Emerging-Disease Hotspots - The Earth Institute at Columbia University
An international research team has provided the first scientific evidence that deadly emerging diseases have risen steeply across the world, and has mapped the outbreaks’ main sources. They say new diseases originating from wild animals in poor nations
mapping  diseases  epidemiology  ecology  environment 
february 2008 by tsuomela

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