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Retirement in America? Too Expensive. | The New Republic
"GRINGOLANDIA: LIFESTYLE MIGRATION UNDER LATE CAPITALISM by Matthew HayesUniversity of Minnesota Press, 276 pp., $26.00"
book  review  retirement  economics  foreign-policy  immigration  poverty 
12 weeks ago by tsuomela
After the Financial Crisis, A Decade of Damage | The New Republic
"CRASHED: HOW A DECADE OF FINANCIAL CRISES CHANGED THE WORLD by Adam ToozeViking, 720 pp., $35.00"
book  review  recession  history  2000s  finance  economics  politics 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Neoliberalism From the Left
"In Leftism Reinvented: Western Parties from Socialism to Neoliberalism, Mudge looks at left parties in advanced capitalist countries over the last century and shows how the experts aligned with those parties pushed them in the direction of spin doctors and markets. In the process, left parties’ ability to represent the interests of their own working-class constituencies was eroded — and ordinary people were shut out of the halls of power."
interview  book  neoliberalism  economics  expertise  socialism  activism  ideology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
The new gilded age: Income inequality in the U.S. by state, metropolitan area, and county | Economic Policy Institute
"This report, our fourth such analysis,1 focuses on trends in income inequality. It uses the latest available data to examine how the top 1 percent and the bottom 99 percent in each state have fared over the years 1917–2015 and to provide a snapshot of top incomes in 2015 by county and metropolitan area."
income-distribution  income  inequality  america  economics 
july 2018 by tsuomela
Is Your Job a Bunch of B.S.? - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Bullshit Jobs A Theory By David Graeber Published 05.15.2018 Simon & Schuster 368 Pages"
book  review  work  labor  jobs  bullshit  purpose  meaning  economics 
may 2018 by tsuomela
A quick rule of thumb is that when someone seems to be acting like a jerk, an economist will defend the behavior as being the essence of morality, but when someone seems to be doing something nice, an economist will raise the bar and argue that he’s not
"A quick rule of thumb is that when someone seems to be acting like a jerk, an economist will defend the behavior as being the essence of morality, but when someone seems to be doing something nice, an economist will raise the bar and argue that he’s not being nice at all."
economics  methods  ideology 
april 2018 by tsuomela
Saving the heartland: Place-based policies in 21st Century America
"America’s regional disparities are large and regional convergence has declined if not disappeared. This wildly uneven economic landscape calls for a new look at spatially targeted policies. There are three plausible justifications for place-based policies–agglomeration economies, spatial equity and larger marginal returns to targeting social distress in high distress areas. The second justification is stronger than the first and the third justification is stronger than the second. The enormous social costs of non-employment suggests that fighting long-term joblessness is more important than fighting income inequality. Stronger tools, such as spatially targeted employment credits, may be needed in West Virginia than in San Francisco."
economics  policy 
march 2018 by tsuomela
Hirschman, A.O.: The Passions and the Interests: Political Arguments for Capitalism before Its Triumph (Paperback and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"In this volume, Albert Hirschman reconstructs the intellectual climate of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to illuminate the intricate ideological transformation that occurred, wherein the pursuit of material interests--so long condemned as the deadly sin of avarice--was assigned the role of containing the unruly and destructive passions of man. Hirschman here offers a new interpretation for the rise of capitalism, one that emphasizes the continuities between old and new, in contrast to the assumption of a sharp break that is a common feature of both Marxian and Weberian thinking. Among the insights presented here is the ironical finding that capitalism was originally supposed to accomplish exactly what was soon denounced as its worst feature: the repression of the passions in favor of the "harmless," if one-dimensional, interests of commercial life. To portray this lengthy ideological change as an endogenous process, Hirschman draws on the writings of a large number of thinkers, including Montesquieu, Sir James Steuart, and Adam Smith."
book  publisher  history  economics  capitalism  ideas 
october 2017 by tsuomela
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