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Against Economics | by David Graeber | The New York Review of Books
"Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky Yale University Press, 492 pp., $35.00"
book  review  economics  heterodoxy  ideology 
november 2019 by tsuomela
Narrative Economics | Princeton University Press
"In a world in which internet troll farms attempt to influence foreign elections, can we afford to ignore the power of viral stories to affect economies? In this groundbreaking book, Nobel Prize–winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller offers a new way to think about the economy and economic change. Using a rich array of historical examples and data, Shiller argues that studying popular stories that affect individual and collective economic behavior—what he calls “narrative economics”—has the potential to vastly improve our ability to predict, prepare for, and lessen the damage of financial crises, recessions, depressions, and other major economic events. Spread through the public in the form of popular stories, ideas can go viral and move markets—whether it’s the belief that tech stocks can only go up, that housing prices never fall, or that some firms are too big to fail. Whether true or false, stories like these—transmitted by word of mouth, by the news media, and increasingly by social media—drive the economy by driving our decisions about how and where to invest, how much to spend and save, and more. But despite the obvious importance of such stories, most economists have paid little attention to them. Narrative Economics sets out to change that by laying the foundation for a way of understanding how stories help propel economic events that have had led to war, mass unemployment, and increased inequality. The stories people tell—about economic confidence or panic, housing booms, the American dream, or Bitcoin—affect economic outcomes. Narrative Economics explains how we can begin to take these stories seriously. It may be Robert Shiller’s most important book to date."
book  publisher  economics  narrative  story-telling  policy 
october 2019 by tsuomela
Trends in College Pricing - Trends in Higher Education - The College Board
"Trends in College Pricing provides information on changes over time in undergraduate tuition and fees, room and board, and other estimated expenses related to attending colleges and universities. The report, which includes data through 2018-19 from the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges, reveals the wide variation in prices charged by institutions of different types and in different parts of the country. Of particular importance is the focus on the net prices students actually pay after taking grant aid into consideration. Data on institutional revenues and expenditures and on changing enrollment patterns over time supplement the data on prices to provide a clearer picture of the circumstances of students and the institutions in which they study."
college  university  cost  pricing  academic  economics  financial-aid 
august 2019 by tsuomela
Frey, C.: The Technology Trap: Capital, Labor, and Power in the Age of Automation (Hardcover, Ebook, Audiobook-mp3 and Audiobook-wav) | Princeton University Press
"How the history of technological revolutions can help us better understand economic and political polarization in the age of automation From the Industrial Revolution to the age of artificial intelligence, The Technology Trap takes a sweeping look at the history of technological progress and how it has radically shifted the distribution of economic and political power among society’s members. As Carl Benedikt Frey shows, the Industrial Revolution created unprecedented wealth and prosperity over the long run, but the immediate consequences of mechanization were devastating for large swaths of the population. Middle-income jobs withered, wages stagnated, the labor share of income fell, profits surged, and economic inequality skyrocketed. These trends, Frey documents, broadly mirror those in our current age of automation, which began with the Computer Revolution. Just as the Industrial Revolution eventually brought about extraordinary benefits for society, artificial intelligence systems have the potential to do the same. But Frey argues that this depends on how the short term is managed. In the nineteenth century, workers violently expressed their concerns over machines taking their jobs. The Luddite uprisings joined a long wave of machinery riots that swept across Europe and China. Today’s despairing middle class has not resorted to physical force, but their frustration has led to rising populism and the increasing fragmentation of society. As middle-class jobs continue to come under pressure, there’s no assurance that positive attitudes to technology will persist. The Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. The Technology Trap demonstrates that in the midst of another technological revolution, the lessons of the past can help us to more effectively face the present."
book  publisher  economics  technology  technology-effects 
july 2019 by tsuomela
The Real Working Class Is Invisible to the Media
"Review of No Longer Newsworthy, by Christopher R. Martin (Cornell University Press, 2019)."
book  review  working-class  class  economics  media-studies 
april 2019 by tsuomela
The Past and Future of Political Economy - American Affairs Journal
"Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky Yale University Press, 2018, 460 pages "
book  review  economics  political-economy  money  monetary-policy 
april 2019 by tsuomela
Retirement in America? Too Expensive. | The New Republic
"GRINGOLANDIA: LIFESTYLE MIGRATION UNDER LATE CAPITALISM by Matthew HayesUniversity of Minnesota Press, 276 pp., $26.00"
book  review  retirement  economics  foreign-policy  immigration  poverty 
november 2018 by tsuomela
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