recentpopularlog in

tsuomela : ethics   472

« earlier  
The Censor's Hand | The MIT Press
"Medical and social progress depend on research with human subjects. When that research is done in institutions getting federal money, it is regulated (often minutely) by federally required and supervised bureaucracies called “institutional review boards” (IRBs). Do—can—these IRBs do more harm than good? In The Censor’s Hand, Schneider addresses this crucial but long-unasked question. Schneider answers the question by consulting a critical but ignored experience—the law’s learning about regulation—and by amassing empirical evidence that is scattered around many literatures. He concludes that IRBs were fundamentally misconceived. Their usefulness to human subjects is doubtful, but they clearly delay, distort, and deter research that can save people’s lives, soothe their suffering, and enhance their welfare. IRBs demonstrably make decisions poorly. They cannot be expected to make decisions well, for they lack the expertise, ethical principles, legal rules, effective procedures, and accountability essential to good regulation. And IRBs are censors in the place censorship is most damaging— universities. In sum, Schneider argues that IRBs are bad regulation that inescapably do more harm than good. They were an irreparable mistake that should be abandoned so that research can be conducted properly and regulated sensibly."
book  publisher  irb  human-subjects  research  ethics 
march 2018 by tsuomela
The Ethics of Technology: A Geometric Analysis of Five Moral Principles // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
"Martin Peterson, The Ethics of Technology: A Geometric Analysis of Five Moral Principles, Oxford University Press, 2017, 252pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190652265."
book  review  technology  ethics  methods  philosophy 
november 2017 by tsuomela
How the Rhetoric of Responsibility Hurts the Welfare State | New Republic
"THE AGE OF RESPONSIBILITY: LUCK, CHOICE, AND THE WELFARE STATE by Yascha MounkHarvard University Press,"
book  review  welfare  responsibility  rhetoric  political-science  philosophy  ethics  collective  commonwealth 
june 2017 by tsuomela
Daniele Fanelli's webpages
"I graduated in Natural Sciences, giving exams in all fundamental disciplines, then obtained a PhD studying the behaviour and genetics of social wasps, and subsequently worked for two years as a science writer. Now I study the nature of science itself, and the mis-behaviours of scientists. Professional highlights I am one of the first natural scientists who specialized 24/7 in the study of scientific misconduct, bias and related issues, and have produced some of the largest studies assessing the prevalence of bias across disciplines and countries. Some of these publications have become quite influential, and my 2009 meta-analysis on surveys about misconduct is one of the most popular papers published in the entire Public Library of Science, currently counting over 185,000 views."
people  science  sts  reproducible  fraud  research  ethics 
may 2017 by tsuomela
Documenting the Now
"DocNow responds to the public's use of social media for chronicling historically significant events as well as demand from scholars, students, and archivists, among others, seeking a user-friendly means of collecting and preserving this type of digital content. DocNow has a strong commitment to prioritizing ethical practices when working with social media content, especially in terms of collection and long-term preservation. This commitment extends to Twitter's notion of honoring user intent and the rights of content creators. The project is a collaborative effort among the University of Maryland, University of California at Riverside, and Washington University in St. Louis. We are extremely grateful for funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation."
social-media  archive  web-archive  preservation  ethics 
may 2017 by tsuomela
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read