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tsuomela : first-amendment   29

Emerging Threats | Knight First Amendment Institute
"The Knight First Amendment Institute’s Emerging Threats series invites leading thinkers to identify and grapple with newly arising or intensifying structural threats to the system of free expression. Fake news, hostile audiences, powerful private platforms, government secret-keeping, and other phenomena have the potential to destabilize political systems and undermine economic and social reform. The papers in the series explore ways to address these threats and preserve the foundations of democracy essential to healthy open societies, including the United States. "
first-amendment  freedom  american  technology 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Jedediah Purdy for Democracy Journal: The Roberts Court v. America
How the Roberts Supreme Court is using the First Amendment to craft a radical, free-market jurisprudence.
law  supreme-court  regulation  government  federal  markets  capitalism  constitution  markets-uber-alles  free-markets  free-speech  first-amendment 
april 2012 by tsuomela
Is protest in America at a turning point?
"Many journalists, it seems, pay lip service to the First Amendment, but turn their backs or grow disdainful when people actually exercise these rights in the streets. In such a climate, idealistic activists such as those at the tar sands pipeline and Wall Street protests, obviously, can be safely ignored by the major news media or condescended to as not being rooted in the practical, real world. Real grown-ups don’t need to protest."
media  media-reform  journalism  failure  protests  activism  wall-street  progressive  fairness  first-amendment  american 
october 2011 by tsuomela
David Bromwich: Cordoba House and Religious Freedom
The worst damage of the crowd actions of the summer has come from the faintheartedness of those who knew better, but declined to denounce them. The crowd has been permitted to go on believing it is wrong for Muslims to do something the Constitution gives all Americans a right to do. How did this deformation of public feeling begin? The protests against Cordoba House shifted from a parochial to a national issue on the impetus of two statements. The first came from Abraham Foxman, the national director of the Anti-Defamation League, on July 30. Foxman put the ADL on the record in sympathy with the protest against the planned community center and mosque. His statement conceded the right of the planners, but defended the prejudice, that is, the rooted feelings of the non-Muslims in this case, regardless of reason, right, or law.
america  racism  bigotry  religion  freedom  constitution  first-amendment  islam  politics 
august 2010 by tsuomela

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