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Welcome to the GEODE Initiative!
"The Geographic Data in Education (GEODE) Initiative at Northwestern University is dedicated to improving public understanding of our world through education about the Earth’s physical, biological, and social systems. Toward that end, the GEODE Initiative is engaged in a program of integrated research and development in the areas of learning, teaching and educational reform. The GEODE Initiative develops and studies curriculum, software, and teacher professional development. "
geography  gis  technology  pedagogy  teaching  education  academic-lab 
april 2017 by tsuomela
Glaciers, gender, and science
Paper has been criticized by global warming denialists as political correctness run amok. "Glaciers are key icons of climate change and global environmental change. However, the relationships among gender, science, and glaciers – particularly related to epistemological questions about the production of glaciological knowledge – remain understudied. This paper thus proposes a feminist glaciology framework with four key components: 1) knowledge producers; (2) gendered science and knowledge; (3) systems of scientific domination; and (4) alternative representations of glaciers. Merging feminist postcolonial science studies and feminist political ecology, the feminist glaciology framework generates robust analysis of gender, power, and epistemologies in dynamic social-ecological systems, thereby leading to more just and equitable science and human-ice interactions."
geography  glaciers  feminism  sts  science  political-correctness  controversy 
march 2016 by tsuomela
A network framework of cultural history
"The emergent processes driving cultural history are a product of complex interactions among large numbers of individuals, determined by difficult-to-quantify historical conditions. To characterize these processes, we have reconstructed aggregate intellectual mobility over two millennia through the birth and death locations of more than 150,000 notable individuals. The tools of network and complexity theory were then used to identify characteristic statistical patterns and determine the cultural and historical relevance of deviations. The resulting network of locations provides a macroscopic perspective of cultural history, which helps us to retrace cultural narratives of Europe and North America using large-scale visualization and quantitative dynamical tools and to derive historical trends of cultural centers beyond the scope of specific events or narrow time intervals."
history  culture  visualization  networks  geography  emergence 
august 2014 by tsuomela
The Hidden Geometry of Complex, Network-Driven Contagion Phenomena
The global spread of epidemics, rumors, opinions, and innovations are complex, network-driven dynamic processes. The combined multiscale nature and intrinsic heterogeneity of the underlying networks make it difficult to develop an intuitive understanding of these processes, to distinguish relevant from peripheral factors, to predict their time course, and to locate their origin. However, we show that complex spatiotemporal patterns can be reduced to surprisingly simple, homogeneous wave propagation patterns, if conventional geographic distance is replaced by a probabilistically motivated effective distance. In the context of global, air-traffic–mediated epidemics, we show that effective distance reliably predicts disease arrival times. Even if epidemiological parameters are unknown, the method can still deliver relative arrival times. The approach can also identify the spatial origin of spreading processes and successfully be applied to data of the worldwide 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and 2003 SARS epidemic.
networks  epidemiology  epidemics  geography 
december 2013 by tsuomela
Welcome to the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center | National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center
"The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) was created in 2008 as part of an ongoing mission to meet the challenges of climate change and its effects on wildlife. The earth's climate, including changes in temperature, weather patterns, and precipitation, will likely result in significant effects on our nation's fish and wildlife resources now and in the future. Relatively little scientific information exists on which to base management strategies to help fish and wildlife adapt to climate change. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is meeting this challenge through the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and partnerships with the Department of the Interior's Climate Science Centers (CSCs)."
government  research  data  management  geography  geology  earth-science  climate-change  environment 
september 2013 by tsuomela
Unique in the Crowd: The privacy bounds of human mobility : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group
"We study fifteen months of human mobility data for one and a half million individuals and find that human mobility traces are highly unique. In fact, in a dataset where the location of an individual is specified hourly, and with a spatial resolution equal to that given by the carrier's antennas, four spatio-temporal points are enough to uniquely identify 95% of the individuals. We coarsen the data spatially and temporally to find a formula for the uniqueness of human mobility traces given their resolution and the available outside information. This formula shows that the uniqueness of mobility traces decays approximately as the 1/10 power of their resolution. Hence, even coarse datasets provide little anonymity. These findings represent fundamental constraints to an individual's privacy and have important implications for the design of frameworks and institutions dedicated to protect the privacy of individuals."
privacy  data-mining  mobile  mobile-phone  gis  geography  big-data  technology-effects 
june 2013 by tsuomela
A 'Whom Do You Hang With?' Map of America : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
"I would call it, for the moment, "The Part Of America Kansas City Hangs With" because that's what this map is saying. It's a new, intriguing way to see our country. This one was built by tracking dollar bill circulation. There've been similar maps built from phone call data. The idea here is to show America not as 50 states, but as regions where people do stuff together. In other words, a "Whom Do You Hang With?" map."
maps  mapping  america  geography  psychogeography 
april 2013 by tsuomela
Patent Producers Clustered in Only a Few Cities - NYTimes.com
"Patents, for all their flaws, are a widely used proxy for innovation. And a new study from the Brookings Institution shows just how clustered patent-related innovation is in America."
patent  cities  innovation  creativity  urbanism  geography 
april 2013 by tsuomela
Antipode - Virtual Issues - Wiley Online Library
"To celebrate Katherine Gibson’s 2012 Antipode RGS-IBG lecture, ‘Take Back the Economy, Any Time, Any Place: Pedagogies for Securing Community Economies’, we’re pleased to present this virtual issue, ‘Imagining and Enacting Community Economies’."
journal  economics  societies  community  geography  academic  research  open-access 
february 2013 by tsuomela
Week 39: On space as a service | Urbanscale
"Broadly speaking, we’ve been considering a set of clearly related, and in some ways overlapping, concerns about the technologically mediated, temporary use of shared spatial resources. And while it’s not at all clear yet if there’s a rocky core at the center of this ideacloud, or, if we found one, how we’d go about developing it into a shipping product or service, it’s our sense that there’s something terrifically exciting and productive waiting to be articulated in here."
geography  data  social-computing  surveillance  privacy  space 
october 2012 by tsuomela
Mapping the Origins and Expansion of the Indo-European Language Family
"There are two competing hypotheses for the origin of the Indo-European language family. The conventional view places the homeland in the Pontic steppes about 6000 years ago. An alternative hypothesis claims that the languages spread from Anatolia with the expansion of farming 8000 to 9500 years ago. We used Bayesian phylogeographic approaches, together with basic vocabulary data from 103 ancient and contemporary Indo-European languages, to explicitly model the expansion of the family and test these hypotheses. We found decisive support for an Anatolian origin over a steppe origin. Both the inferred timing and root location of the Indo-European language trees fit with an agricultural expansion from Anatolia beginning 8000 to 9500 years ago. These results highlight the critical role that phylogeographic inference can play in resolving debates about human prehistory."
languages  linguistics  modeling  bayes  statistics  geography  anthropology 
august 2012 by tsuomela
‘Suburban’ is not the same as ‘theologically conservative’
The suburbanization of American Christianity has had a huge impact on institutional and denominational structures. Automobile-shaped development has produced an automobile-shaped ecclesiology. The car has abolished the possibility of the parish. And that, in turn, has helped to redefine “neighbor” as a matter of preference more than of proximity — as optional rather than obligatory. That redefinition is rather significant, since “Who is my neighbor?” is kind of an important question for Christians. Annotated link http://www.diigo.com/bookmark/http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2012/07/17/suburban-is-not-the-same-as-theologically-conservative/
religion  geography  suburbia  automobile  transportation  design  architecture  belief  evangelical  conservative 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Destroying Nature Unleashes Infectious Diseases - NYTimes.com
If we fail to understand and take care of the natural world, it can cause a breakdown of these systems and come back to haunt us in ways we know little about. A critical example is a developing model of infectious disease that shows that most epidemics — AIDS, Ebola, West Nile, SARS, Lyme disease and hundreds more that have occurred over the last several decades — don’t just happen. They are a result of things people do to nature.
environment  ecology  biology  disease  epidemiology  epidemics  nature  evolution  geography 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Once Upon a Place: Telling Stories With Maps - Suzanne Fischer - The Atlantic
"To present your ambiguous stories, the Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia Libraries has made Neatline, an open-source geo-temporal visualization tool. Neatline, which launched last week, is a plugin for the popular collections exhibit software Omeka (which was developed by another university digital humanities shop, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University). It gives users the opportunity to tell stories through historic maps, timelines, and short text pieces: three dimensions of interpretation. (A fourth dimension, longform essays, is on its way.) It's also a small contribution to the rethinking of what counts as humanities scholarship."
geography  vgi  information  archives  digital  mapping  tool  time  history  story-telling 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Mapping the Nation - A Companion Site to Mapping the Nation by Susan Schulten
From maps of disease and the weather to the earliest maps of the national population, this was a period when the very concept of a map was reinvented. By the early twentieth century, maps had become common tools of analysis, communication, and visual representation in an increasingly complex nation.
Today we live in a world that is saturated with maps and graphic knowledge. The maps on this site reveal how this involved a fundamentally new way of thinking.
gis  geography  mapping  maps  history  america 
june 2012 by tsuomela
Partisan rancour and public universities: Polarisation in the People's Republic of Madison | The Economist
The role of universities in the story of American polarisation seems to me under-appreciated. America's college towns facilitate within-state sorting according to political affinity by offering temperamentally liberal Wisconsinites or Georgians or Texans attractive places to live among fellow bleeding hearts, but without having to go too far from home. Big state universities also act as magnets drawing "foreign", out-of-state academics, artists and their wannabe students away from their natural habitats on the coasts, counteracting to some degree the polarward drift of right-leaning states.
politics  american  university  education  geography 
june 2012 by tsuomela
Twitter, NPR’s Morning Edition, and Dreams of Flatland | metaLAB (at) Harvard
Here’s the thing: Twitter is part of the “real world.” The Internet is part of the world.

In association with Wellman et al.’s work on the geography of networks, a rich and informative research domain takes shape. With Morning Edition we want a broad reading of Internet scholarship
twitter  social-media  internet  media  journalism  framing  description  social-science  research  geography 
february 2012 by tsuomela
Michael Frank Goodchild
"Michael F. Goodchild is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Spatial Studies. He received his B.A. degree from Cambridge University in Physics in 1965 and his Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University in 1969, and has received four honorary doctorates."
people  geography  academia  school(UCSB)  volunteer  vgi 
october 2011 by tsuomela
Inundated with placenames « Derek Watkins
Generic place names (or toponyms) such as Cumberland Gap or Mount Rainier provide general categorical descriptions of a geographic feature, in contrast to specific toponyms, which provide a unique identifier: Lake Huron. This map taps into the place names contained in the USGS National Hydrography Dataset to show how the generic names of streams vary across the lower 48. Creeks and rivers are symbolized in gray due to their ubiquity (although the etymology behind the American use of creek is interesting), while bright colors symbolize other popular toponyms.
geography  naming  mapping  maps  visualization 
september 2011 by tsuomela
Tunisia, Egypt, Miami: The Importance of Internet Choke Points - Andrew Blum - Technology - The Atlantic
"Terremark's building in Miami is the physical meeting point for more than 160 networks from around the world. They meet there because of the building's excellent security, its redundant power systems, and its thick concrete walls, designed to survive a category 5 hurricane. But above all, they meet there because the building is "carrier-neutral." It's a Switzerland of the Internet, an unallied territory where competing networks can connect to each other. Terremark doesn't have a dog in the fight. Or at least it didn't."
internet  infrastructure  geography  networks  network  monopoly  vulnerability  politics  regulation  design 
march 2011 by tsuomela
The 12 States Of America - Magazine - The Atlantic
"We analyzed reams of demographic, economic, cultural, and political data to break the nation’s 3,141 counties into 12 statistically distinct “types of place.” When we look at family income over the past 30 years through that prism, the full picture of the income divide becomes clearer—and much starker. "
america  geography  income  income-distribution  economics 
march 2011 by tsuomela
On River Maps « somethingaboutmaps
"Lately I’ve been working on a series of river maps, done in the style of Harry Beck‘s famous London Underground design."
maps  mapping  gis  geography  design 
february 2011 by tsuomela
Border Bias — Psychological Science
In this research, we documented a bias in which people underestimate the potential risk of a disaster to a target location when the disaster spreads from a different state, but not when it spreads from an equally distant location within the same state. We term this the border bias. Following research on categorization, we propose that people consider locations within a state to be part of the same superordinate category, but consider locations in two different states to be parts of different superordinate categories. The border bias occurs because people apply state-based categorization to events that are not governed by human-made boundaries. Such categorization results in state borders being considered physical barriers that can keep disasters at bay. We demonstrated the border bias for different types of disasters (earthquake, environmental risk) and tested the underlying process in three studies.
risk  perception  estimation  bias  geography  psychology  borders 
october 2010 by tsuomela
Encyclopedia of Earth
Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Earth, an electronic reference about the Earth, its natural environments, and their interaction with society. The Encyclopedia is a free, fully searchable collection of articles written by scholars, professionals, educators, and experts who collaborate and review each other's work. The articles are written in non-technical language and are useful to students, educators, scholars, professionals, as well as to the general public.
education  science  environment  reference  encyclopedia  earth  ecology  geography  expertise  reputation 
september 2010 by tsuomela
Santa Fe-ing of the World | Newgeography.com
The dominant forms of transportation today are the automobile, the jet plane, and the networked computer. What does adding the networked computer get you? I think the answer is “the Santa-Fe-ing of the World.” This means the rise of places where the entire point of which is face-to-face contact. These places are concentrated and walkable, like villages. Some are embedded in the old downtowns – such as Adams Morgan in Washington, or The Left Bank of Paris, or the charming portions of what in London is referred to, somewhat narcissistically, as “The City.” Some are part of what have traditionally been regarded as suburbs or edge cities, such as Reston, Virginia, or Emeryville/Berkeley, California.
development  geography  urban  economics  edge-city 
june 2010 by tsuomela
Burgh Diaspora - Economic Development From Geographic Mobility
Jim Russell - I'm a geographer with a special interest in diaspora economics. My mission is to help Rust Belt communities such as Pittsburgh benefit from the export of talent.
weblog-individual  economics  urban  development  community  geography 
june 2010 by tsuomela
GeoCommons
GeoCommons delivers visual analytics through maps. We make it possible to view massive amounts of data, make decisions and solve problems with no prior training or experience using traditional mapping tools.
maps  visualization  mashup  gis  data  tools  web2.0  map  geography  public-data 
april 2010 by tsuomela
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