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Chasing the Apocalypse — Real Life
Visiting abandoned nuclear test sites in the Nevada desert.
nuclear  war  history  tourism  travel  state(Nevada) 
13 days ago by tsuomela
Book Review: 'Future Sounds: The Story of Electronic Music' - The Atlantic
"Future Sounds: The Story of Electronic Music From Stockhausen to Skrillex by David Stubbs Faber & Faber "
book  review  electronic  music  history 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Science’s Freedom Fighters - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Freedom’s Laboratory The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science By Audra J. Wolfe Published 11.18.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 312 Pages"
book  review  sts  science  history  cold-war  propaganda 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Mapping Social Movements
"This project produces and displays free interactive maps showing the historical geography of dozens of social movements that have influenced American life and politics since the start of the 20th century, including radical movements, civil rights movements, labor movements, women's movements, and more."
maps  history  social-movement  american-studies 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Time for Another Reinvention | Dissent Magazine
"Leftism Reinvented: Western Parties from Socialism to Neoliberalism by Stephanie L. Mudge Harvard University Press, 2018, 524 pp"
book  review  leftism  socialism  history 
november 2018 by tsuomela
The Limits of Liberal History | Current Affairs
Review of 'These Truths: A history of the United States' by Jill Lepore
book  review  history  america  labor 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Almost Too Sober: On the Appeal of Stoicism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life By A. A. Long, Epictetus Published 10.30.2018 Princeton University Press 232 Pages"
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  history 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Unflattening Hobbes
Very interesting breakdown of how the different levels - individual, pack, troop, tribe, and imagined community - may continue to be in conflict without disrupting the whole of civilization.
history  war  future  violence  peace 
october 2018 by tsuomela
Divided We Stand : Democracy Journal
"The Polarizers: Postwar Architects of Our Partisan Era By Sam Rosenfeld • University Of Chicago Press • 336 pages • $30"
book  review  history  political-science  partisanship 
september 2018 by tsuomela
What Makes Hunting So Divisive | The New Republic
"THE FAIR CHASE: THE EPIC STORY OF HUNTING IN AMERICA by Philip DrayBasic Books, 416 pp., $32.00"
book  review  american-studies  sports  environmental  history 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Dispossessed Lives | Marisa J. Fuentes
"In the eighteenth century, Bridgetown, Barbados, was heavily populated by both enslaved and free women. Marisa J. Fuentes creates a portrait of urban Caribbean slavery in this colonial town from the perspective of these women whose stories appear only briefly in historical records. Fuentes takes us through the streets of Bridgetown with an enslaved runaway; inside a brothel run by a freed woman of color; in the midst of a white urban household in sexual chaos; to the gallows where enslaved people were executed; and within violent scenes of enslaved women's punishments. In the process, Fuentes interrogates the archive and its historical production to expose the ongoing effects of white colonial power that constrain what can be known about these women. Combining fragmentary sources with interdisciplinary methodologies that include black feminist theory and critical studies of history and slavery, Dispossessed Lives demonstrates how the construction of the archive marked enslaved women's bodies, in life and in death. By vividly recounting enslaved life through the experiences of individual women and illuminating their conditions of confinement through the legal, sexual, and representational power wielded by slave owners, colonial authorities, and the archive, Fuentes challenges the way we write histories of vulnerable and often invisible subjects."
book  publisher  history  archives  slavery 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Collecting the World — James Delbourgo | Harvard University Press
"In 1759 the British Museum opened its doors to the general public—the first free national museum in the world. James Delbourgo’s biography of Hans Sloane recounts the story behind its creation, told through the life of a figure with an insatiable ambition to pit universal knowledge against superstition and the means to realize his dream. Born in northern Ireland in 1660, Sloane amassed a fortune as a London society physician, becoming a member of the Whig establishment and president of the Royal Society and Royal College of Physicians. His wealth and contacts enabled him to assemble an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects—the most famous cabinet of curiosities of its time. For Sloane, however, collecting a world of objects meant collecting a world of people, including slaves. His marriage to the heir of sugar plantations in Jamaica gave Sloane access to the experiences of planters and the folkways of their human property. With few curbs on his passion for collecting, he established a network of agents to supply artifacts from China, India, North America, the Caribbean, and beyond. Wampum beads, rare manuscripts, a shoe made from human skin—nothing was off limits to Sloane’s imagination. This splendidly illustrated volume offers a new perspective on the entanglements of global scientific discovery with imperialism in the eighteenth century. The first biography of Sloane based on the full range of his writings and collections, Collecting the World tells the rich and complex story of one of the Enlightenment’s most controversial luminaries."
book  publisher  museum  history  imperialism  museology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
After the Financial Crisis, A Decade of Damage | The New Republic
"CRASHED: HOW A DECADE OF FINANCIAL CRISES CHANGED THE WORLD by Adam ToozeViking, 720 pp., $35.00"
book  review  recession  history  2000s  finance  economics  politics 
august 2018 by tsuomela
The Recent Unpleasantness: Understanding the Cycles of Constitutional Time by Jack M. Balkin :: SSRN
"This article, originally given as the 2017 Addison C. Harris Lecture at Indiana University, analyzes recent events in terms of three great cycles of change in American constitutional history. The first is the cycle of the rise and fall of political regimes. The second is the cycle of polarization and depolarization. The third is the cycle of the decay and renewal of republican government--the cycle of constitutional rot. Each of these cycles operates on a different time scale. Their interaction generates "constitutional time." Many commentators worry that the United States is in a period of constitutional crisis, or that American democracy is doomed. These fears, although understandable, are overstated. America is not in a constitutional crisis, although it is suffering from a fairly severe case of constitutional rot, connected to rising polarization and economic inequality. Our current difficulties are a temporary condition. They stem from the fact that the Reagan regime that has structured American politics since the 1980s is dying, but a new regime has yet to be born. This is a difficult, agonizing, and humbling transition; and its difficulty is enhanced by the fact that, unlike the last transition, it occurs at the peak of a cycle of polarization and at the low point of a cycle of constitutional rot. For that reason, the transition to a new political regime is likely to be especially difficult. But we will get through it. And when we get through it, about five to ten years from now, American politics will look quite different. Political renewal is hardly foreordained: it will require persistence and political effort. The point of this lecture is to offer a bit of hope in difficult times. If people misunderstand our situation, and conclude that American decline is inevitable, they may unwittingly help to make that fate a reality; but if they understand the cycles of constitutional time, they may come to believe that their democracy can be redeemed, and do their part to realize that worthy goal. "
political-science  law  constitution  history  american-studies 
august 2018 by tsuomela
osf.io
"In the last 25 years we have seen the web enable new digital means for historians to reach broader publics and audiences. Over that same period of time, archives and archivists have been exploring and engaging with related strands of digital transformation. In one strand, similar focus on community work through digital means has emerged in both areas. While historians have been developing a community of practice around public history, archivists and archives have similarly been reframing their work as more user-centered and more closely engaged with communities and their records. A body of archival work and scholarship has emerged around the function of community archives that presents significant possibilities for further connections with the practices of history and historians. In a second strand, strategies for understanding and preserving digital cultural heritage have also taken shape. While historians have begun exploring using tools to produce new forms of digital scholarship, archivists and archives have been working to both develop methods to care for and make available digital material. Archivists have established tools, workflows, vocabulary and infrastructure for digital archives, and they have also managed the digitization of collections to expand access. At the intersection of these two developments, we see a significant convergence between the needs and practices of public historians and archivists. Historians’ new forms of scholarship increasingly function as forms of knowledge infrastructure. Archivists work on systems for enabling access to collections are themselves anchored in longstanding commitments to infrastructure for enabling the use of records. At this convergence, there is a significant opportunity for historians to begin to connect more with archivists as peers, as experts in questions of the structure and order of sources and records. In this essay we explore the ways that archives, archivists, and archival practice are evolving around both analog and digital activities that are highly relevant for those interested in working in digital public history."
history  archives 
august 2018 by tsuomela
American Scientist
"MARKETING THE MOON: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program. David Meerman Scott and Richard Jurek. xiv + 130 pp. MIT Press, 2014. $39.95."
book  review  space  history  technology  marketing  nasa 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The American Academic Mistaken for a Spy | The New Republic
"MY LIFE AS A SPY: INVESTIGATIONS IN A SECRET POLICE FILE by Katherine VerderyDuke University Press Books, 344 pp., $27.95"
book  review  cold-war  history  anthropology  spying 
july 2018 by tsuomela
TECHNOLOGICAL THREATS TO CIVIL LIBERTIES
"Following are the final speaking notes for the informal Douglas Paper #8282, “Technological Threats to Civil Liberty”, presented at the IEEE's 15th Annual Asilomar Invitational Microcomputer Workshop, 26 - 28 April 1989 at Asilomar, CA. MDC builds weapons to defend the Free World and, by extension, its values and institutions. Examination of technological impacts on freedom is not, therefore, entirely inappropriate. The underlying thesis is that most channels of information flow have been exploited sooner or later for the purposes of control and maintenance of social order, benign or not. "
technology-effects  surveillance  history  1980s 
june 2018 by tsuomela
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