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tsuomela : market   10

International land deals: who is investing and where | Claire Provost | Global development | guardian.co.uk
The Land Matrix database is now the most comprehensive public source for information on international land deals – but it is not perfect. Some countries, for example, may be over-represented in the data simply because they are more transparent and routinely publish contract information. In other cases, the data may be skewed towards investors or countries that have featured in more media reports.
data  land-use  market  economics  exchange  international 
may 2012 by tsuomela
Center for a Stateless Society
"The Center for a Stateless Society is a project of the Molinari Institute and dedicated to building public awareness of, and support for, market anarchism. We provide news commentary, related analysis and original research from our unique perspective, serving as a market anarchist media center."
market  anarchism  economics  politics  institutes  activism 
september 2011 by tsuomela
Ugo Mattei on the Commons, Market and State | David Bollier
"The real problem is that the State and Market are locked in a symbiotic alliance to the detriment of the commons. This unholy alliance so tenacious because it is embedded in our very phenomenological understanding of life, writes Mattei. We perceive the world as a mechanistic system in which subject and object are separate and distinct, and we supposedly have individual autonomy to do what we wish to act upon the world. As subjects, we tend to pracel out and commodify the world into units that are isolated from the larger whole
commons  state  market  politics  economics  ideology  reductionism  phenomenology  perception  markets 
july 2011 by tsuomela
The Slow Change in Legal Discourse: Why Humans Are Dumber Than Frogs - Garrett Epps - National - The Atlantic
The word "private," in fact, seemed to have an almost hypnotic effect on the Court. Chief Justice John Roberts said "the decision is made by a private entity whether to use the money to go to a religious school." True, but that's quite different from "private choice" by parents. Under the Constitution, the state couldn't limit parents' choice by ruling out schools on religious grounds; an STO can. It's almost as if the government could get around any constitutional limitation by just farming the work out to "private entities."

And of course, that's increasingly what we as a society are doing. Our very notion of what is public is shrinking. Wars are fought by "private" contractors, prisons are run by "private" companies. Great state universities are "privatized" and taken out of state control. We hear increasing demands that all or most public employees be replaced by workers hired and paid by private companies.
private  market  discourse  legal  law  supreme-court  public  public-sphere 
november 2010 by tsuomela
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: The unrevolution
What most characterizes today's web revolutionaries is their rigorously apolitical and ahistorical perspectives - their fear of actually being revolutionary. To them, the technological upheaval of the web ends in a reinforcement of the status quo. There's nothing wrong with that view, I suppose - these are all writers who court business audiences - but their writings do testify to just how far we've come from the idealism of the early days of cyberspace, when online communities were proudly uncommercial and the free exchanges of the web stood in opposition to what John Perry Barlow dismissively termed "the Industrial World." By encouraging us to think of sharing as "collaborative consumption" and of our intellectual capacities as "cognitive surplus," the technologies of the web now look like they will have, as their ultimate legacy, the spread of market forces into the most intimate spheres of human activity.
politics  internet  market  capitalism  communism  ideology  idealism  technology 
november 2010 by tsuomela

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