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tsuomela : metrics   49

Muller, J.: The Tyranny of Metrics (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage our obsession with metrics is causing—and shows how we can begin to fix the problem. Filled with examples from education, medicine, business and finance, government, the police and military, and philanthropy and foreign aid, this brief and accessible book explains why the seemingly irresistible pressure to quantify performance distorts and distracts, whether by encouraging "gaming the stats" or "teaching to the test." That's because what can and does get measured is not always worth measuring, may not be what we really want to know, and may draw effort away from the things we care about. Along the way, we learn why paying for measured performance doesn't work, why surgical scorecards may increase deaths, and much more. But metrics can be good when used as a complement to—rather than a replacement for—judgment based on personal experience, and Muller also gives examples of when metrics have been beneficial. Complete with a checklist of when and how to use metrics, The Tyranny of Metrics is an essential corrective to a rarely questioned trend that increasingly affects us all."
book  publisher  metrics  measurement  business  organizations 
may 2018 by tsuomela
Know Your Competition
Interesting thoughts about 3 different levels of competition and which may easier or harder to make an impact at.
competition  success  metrics  gtd  productivity  work  goals  goal-setting 
december 2017 by tsuomela
Research Information Management: Defining RIM and the Library's Role
"Research information management (RIM) is the aggregation, curation, and utilization of information about research and is emerging as an area of increasing interest and relevance in many university libraries. RIM intersects with many aspects of traditional library services in discovery, acquisition, dissemination, and analysis of scholarly activities, and does so through the nexus with institutional data systems, faculty workflows, and institutional partners. RIM adoption offers libraries new opportunities to support institutional and researcher goals. In this paper prepared by Rebecca Bryant, OCLC Research Senior Program Officer, and a working group of librarians representing OCLC Research Library Partnership institutions, learn more about what RIM is, what is driving RIM adoption, and the library’s role in RIM."
research  research-data  libraries  metrics  scholarly-communication 
october 2017 by tsuomela
Data, a first-class research output
" The Make Data Count (MDC) project is funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to develop and deploy the social and technical infrastructure necessary to elevate data to a first-class research output alongside more traditional products, such as publications. It will run between May 2017 and April 2019. The project will address the significant social as well as technical barriers to widespread incorporation of data-level metrics in the research data management ecosystem through consultation, recommendation, new technical capability, and community outreach. Project work will build upon long-standing partner initiatives supporting research data management and DLM, leverage prior Sloan investments in key technologies such as Lagotto, and enlist the cooperation of the research, library, funder, and publishing stakeholder communities."
research-data  management  metrics  altmetrics  data-science  data  publishing  scholarly-communication 
may 2017 by tsuomela
Kudos
"Kudos is a web-based service that helps researchers and their institutions and funders to maximize the visibility and impact of their published articles. Kudos provides a platform for assembling and creating information to help search filtering, for sharing information to drive discovery, and for measuring and monitoring the effect of these activities. "
science  communication  scholarly-communication  altmetrics  metrics 
march 2015 by tsuomela
Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications
"Scientific research performed with the involvement of the broader public (the crowd) attracts increasing attention from scientists and policy makers. A key premise is that project organizers may be able to draw on underused human resources to advance research at relatively low cost. Despite a growing number of examples, systematic research on the effort contributions volunteers are willing to make to crowd science projects is lacking. Analyzing data on seven different projects, we quantify the financial value volunteers can bring by comparing their unpaid contributions with counterfactual costs in traditional or online labor markets. The volume of total contributions is substantial, although some projects are much more successful in attracting effort than others. Moreover, contributions received by projects are very uneven across time—a tendency toward declining activity is interrupted by spikes typically resulting from outreach efforts or media attention. Analyzing user-level data, we find that most contributors participate only once and with little effort, leaving a relatively small share of users who return responsible for most of the work. Although top contributor status is earned primarily through higher levels of effort, top contributors also tend to work faster. This speed advantage develops over multiple sessions, suggesting that it reflects learning rather than inherent differences in skills. Our findings inform recent discussions about potential benefits from crowd science, suggest that involving the crowd may be more effective for some kinds of projects than others, provide guidance for project managers, and raise important questions for future research."
citizen-science  crowdsourcing  participation  success  public-understanding  metrics  measurement 
january 2015 by tsuomela
Big brother in the academy | Features | Times Higher Education
"As monitoring of scholars’ performance, time and output increases, so do reservations about its value and effectiveness"
academic  academia  monitor  work  metrics  measurement  value 
october 2014 by tsuomela
[1407.8010] Alternative metrics in scientometrics: A meta-analysis of research into three altmetrics
"Alternative metrics are currently one of the most popular research topics in scientometric research. This paper provides an overview of research into three of the most important altmetrics: microblogging (Twitter), online reference managers (Mendeley and CiteULike) and blogging. The literature is discussed in relation to the possible use of altmetrics in research evaluation. Since the research was particularly interested in the correlation between altmetrics counts and citation counts, this overview focuses particularly on this correlation. For each altmetric, a meta-analysis is calculated for its correlation with traditional citation counts. As the results of the meta-analyses show, the correlation with traditional citations for micro-blogging counts is negligible (pooled r=0.003), for blog counts it is small (pooled r=0.12) and for bookmark counts from online reference managers, medium to large (CiteULike pooled r=0.23; Mendeley pooled r=0.51). Since the added value of an alternative metric, as an additional metric compared with traditional citation counts, is greater the less it correlates with traditional citation counts, the greatest added value - according to the meta-analysis - is associated with Twitter citations."
altmetrics  metrics  bibliometrics  measurement 
august 2014 by tsuomela
Kudos
"Kudos helps researchers explain, enrich and share their publications for greater research impact."
altmetrics  research  impact  metrics  measurement 
july 2014 by tsuomela
Why Our Definition Of "Failure" Gets An F | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation
"New tools like Kickboard Wireless Generation, and ClassDojo have the potential to help teachers capture far more fine-grained data about students’ day-to-day performance and interactions, which besides being good for teaching, could eventually be made the basis of a more nuanced picture of what happens in schools. But this data needs to be paired with nuanced judgments by politicians and the public."
education  reform  measurement  metrics  automation  digital  judgment  values 
september 2012 by tsuomela
Who’s dumber: Congress or Martin Luther King Jr.? The dumb report on congressional dumbness - Yahoo! News
"If you skim Sunlight’s findings, and bring to them a sporting quotient of party prejudice, you might conclude that Republicans are, say, “idiots” and Democrats are, oh, “showoffs.” To use the pre-K-level idiom preferred by the biased twerp in each of us.

If, however, you listen to a sampler of speeches by various congresspeople at a range of oration grade levels, you might find something completely different."
politics  language  rhetoric  measurement  metrics  grading  useless  congress 
may 2012 by tsuomela
Toolmaker Talk: Yoni Donner (Quantified Mind) | Quantified Self
Donner: Quantified Mind is a web application that allows users to track the variation in their cognitive functions under different conditions, using cognitive tests that are based on long-standing principles from psychology, but adapted to be repeatable, short, engaging, automatic and adaptive.

The goal is to make cognitive optimization an exact science instead of relying on subjective feelings, which can be deceiving or so subtle that they are hard to interpret. Quantified Mind allows fun and easy self-experimentation and data analysis that can lead to actionable conclusions.
quantified-self  cognition  psychology  metrics  measurement  self-improvement 
april 2012 by tsuomela
ingentaconnect Using curriculum vitae to compare some impacts of NSF research gr...
"While traditional grants remain central in US federal support of academic scientists and engineers, the role of multidisciplinary NSF Centers is growing. Little is known about how funding through these Centers affects scientific output or (as is an NSF aim) increases academic collaboration with industry. This paper tests the use of CVs to examine how Center funding affects researchers’ publication rates and their obtaining industry grants. We find that CVs are indeed usable, but some ways of collecting them work much better than others, and that researchers who obtain Center grants are more likely to obtain grants from industry too, suggesting that this NSF aim is being met. We do not find that Centers improve publication rates. "
research  funding  productivity  metrics  measurement  methods  cv 
february 2011 by tsuomela
Science in the Open » Blog Archive » A collaborative proposal on research metrics
When we talk about open research practice, more efficient research communication, wider diversity of publication we always come up against the same problem. What’s in it for the jobbing scientist? This is so prevalent that it has been reformulated as “Singh’s Law” (by analogy with Godwin’s law) that any discussion of research practice will inevitably end when someone brings up career advancement or tenure. The question is what do we actually do about this?
open-science  open-research  incentives  metrics 
september 2010 by tsuomela
The Sydney Morning Herald Blogs: Innovator
summary Boston Consulting Group report on measuring innovation.
innovation  business  metrics  measurement 
april 2009 by tsuomela
HAP International
HAP International runs the leading global quality assurance scheme for humanitarian agencies.
non-profit  humanitarian  accountability  measurement  metrics  success 
march 2009 by tsuomela
Interfluidity :: Crocodile tears and the LIBOR-OIS spread
What is very clear is that LIBOR serves as the basis of many thousands of private sector contracts, and that the banking system as a whole is a net receiver of LIBOR-indexed funds. To the degree that LIBOR does not reflect banks effective cost of funds, an elevated rate can be viewed as a hidden tax of the nonfinacial sector by banks. Rather than reflecting the banking system's pain, a high LIBOR might indicate banks' ability to leverage their collective insolvency to charge higher rates on nonfinacial firms without complaint.
banking  finance  interest  metrics  measurement  crisis  libor 
october 2008 by tsuomela
Twin Cities Compass - Home
Twin Cities Compass promotes our region's well-being by measuring progress, reporting findings and providing strategies for action.
It is led by Wilder Research in partnership with community-serving organizations, funders and volunteers.
minneapolis  minnesota  social  activism  progressive  metrics  data  trends 
april 2008 by tsuomela

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