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Philosophy for Everyone and No One: On Two Recent Books by John Kaag - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Hiking with Nietzsche On Becoming Who You Are By John Kaag Published 09.25.2018 Farrar, Straus and Giroux"
books  review  philosophy  autobiography 
may 2019 by tsuomela
Netflix and Nil - The New Atlantis
"Nihilism and Technology By Nolen Gertz Rowman & Littlefield Int. 2018 ~ 227 pp. $85 (cloth) $34.95 (paper)"
book  review  technology-critique  philosophy  about(FredrichNietzsche)  nihilism 
april 2019 by tsuomela
Kierkegaard, D. Anthony Storm's Commentary on
"Søren Aabye Kierkegaard was a nineteenth century existentialist philosopher, and arguably both the father of existentialism and modern psychology. He is a grossly misunderstood figure, whom some argue was a mystic, an anti-rationalist, or, as is more reasonable, an anti-philosopher. Often his overtly religious writings are overlooked or de-Christianized in favor of the pseudonymous authorship. An idiosyncratic style, along with a complex authorial method, go far in confounding the unwary reader. This site features a commentary on the writings of Kierkegaard. Information on every published work and article (including many unfinished writings and journal entries) is presented here with publication data, quotes, detailed commentary, and images. There are also supplementary materials to aid in your research. A good place to start is to go straight to the Commentary itself where you can view abstracts of the works before diving in."
philosophy  19c  commentary  religion  existentialism  faith 
march 2019 by tsuomela
Understanding Society: Bodily cognition
"The Oxford Handbook of 4E Cognition, edited by Albert Newen, Leon de Brun, and Shaun Gallagher, "
book  review  cognition  extended  philosophy  metaphysics 
february 2019 by tsuomela
Can Stoicism Make Us Happy? | The Nation
A strong critique that ancient Greek stoicism cannot be applied to 21c life because the Greek view was strongly connected to a divine and providential world as created by Zeus.
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  religion  ontology 
february 2019 by tsuomela
What Does Literary Studies Know? - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Paper Minds Literature and the Ecology of Consciousness By Jonathan Kramnick Published 09.07.2018 University of Chicago Press 208 Pages"
book  review  literary-criticism  philosophy 
december 2018 by tsuomela
Understanding Ignorance | The MIT Press
"An exploration of what we can know about what we don't know: why ignorance is more than simply a lack of knowledge. Ignorance is trending. Politicians boast, “I'm not a scientist.” Angry citizens object to a proposed state motto because it is in Latin, and “This is America, not Mexico or Latin America.” Lack of experience, not expertise, becomes a credential. Fake news and repeated falsehoods are accepted and shape firm belief. Ignorance about American government and history is so alarming that the ideal of an informed citizenry now seems quaint. Conspiracy theories and false knowledge thrive. This may be the Information Age, but we do not seem to be well informed. In this book, philosopher Daniel DeNicola explores ignorance—its abundance, its endurance, and its consequences. DeNicola aims to understand ignorance, which seems at first paradoxical. How can the unknown become known—and still be unknown? But he argues that ignorance is more than a lack or a void, and that it has dynamic and complex interactions with knowledge. Taking a broadly philosophical approach, DeNicola examines many forms of ignorance, using the metaphors of ignorance as place, boundary, limit, and horizon. He treats willful ignorance and describes the culture in which ignorance becomes an ideological stance. He discusses the ethics of ignorance, including the right not to know, considers the supposed virtues of ignorance, and concludes that there are situations in which ignorance is morally good. Ignorance is neither pure nor simple. It is both an accusation and a defense (“You are ignorant!” “Yes, but I didn't know!”). Its practical effects range from the inconsequential to the momentous. It is a scourge, but, DeNicola argues daringly, it may also be a refuge, a value, even an accompaniment to virtue. Hardcover Out of Print ISBN: 9780262036443 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in August 2017 Paperback $17.95 T | £13.99 ISBN: 9780262536035 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in September 2018 Share Share "
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth  ignorance  agnotology 
november 2018 by tsuomela
True Enough | The MIT Press
"The development of an epistemology that explains how science and art embody and convey understanding. Philosophy valorizes truth, holding that there can never be epistemically good reasons to accept a known falsehood, or to accept modes of justification that are not truth conducive. How can this stance account for the epistemic standing of science, which unabashedly relies on models, idealizations, and thought experiments that are known not to be true? In True Enough, Catherine Elgin argues that we should not assume that the inaccuracy of models and idealizations constitutes an inadequacy. To the contrary, their divergence from truth or representational accuracy fosters their epistemic functioning. When effective, models and idealizations are, Elgin contends, felicitous falsehoods that exemplify features of the phenomena they bear on. Because works of art deploy the same sorts of felicitous falsehoods, she argues, they also advance understanding. Elgin develops a holistic epistemology that focuses on the understanding of broad ranges of phenomena rather than knowledge of individual facts. Epistemic acceptability, she maintains, is a matter not of truth-conduciveness, but of what would be reflectively endorsed by the members of an idealized epistemic community—a quasi-Kantian realm of epistemic ends."
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Almost Too Sober: On the Appeal of Stoicism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life By A. A. Long, Epictetus Published 10.30.2018 Princeton University Press 232 Pages"
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  history 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Origgi, G., Holmes, S. and Arikha, N.: Reputation: What It Is and Why It Matters (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Reputation touches almost everything, guiding our behavior and choices in countless ways. But it is also shrouded in mystery. Why is it so powerful when the criteria by which people and things are defined as good or bad often appear to be arbitrary? Why do we care so much about how others see us that we may even do irrational and harmful things to try to influence their opinion? In this engaging book, Gloria Origgi draws on philosophy, social psychology, sociology, economics, literature, and history to offer an illuminating account of an important yet oddly neglected subject. Origgi examines the influence of the Internet and social media, as well as the countless ranking systems that characterize modern society and contribute to the creation of formal and informal reputations in our social relations, in business, in politics, in academia, and even in wine. She highlights the importance of reputation to the effective functioning of the economy and e-commerce. Origgi also discusses the existential significance of our obsession with reputation, concluding that an awareness of the relationship between our reputation and our actions empowers us to better understand who we are and why we do what we do. Compellingly written and filled with surprising insights, Reputation pins down an elusive subject that affects everyone."
book  publisher  reputation  information-literacy  philosophy 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Taking Philosophy Forward - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Taking Back Philosophy A Multicultural Manifesto By Bryan W. Van Norden Published 12.05.2017 Columbia University Press 248 Pages"
book  review  philosophy  multiculturalism 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Play Anything | Ian Bogost
"How filling life with play—whether soccer or lawn mowing, counting sheep or tossing Angry Birds—forges a new path for creativity and joy in our impatient age. Life is no game. It’s demanding, boring, and rarely fun. But what if we’ve got games wrong? Playing anything—whether an instrument, a sport, or a video game—takes hard work and makes absurd demands. Where’s the fun in that? In Play Anything, acclaimed philosopher and award-winning game designer Ian Bogost reveals that play isn’t a mindless escape from boring reality. Instead, play is what happens when we accept limitations, narrow our focus, and—consequently—have fun. Which is also how to live a good life. Manipulating cards to make a poker hand is no different than treating chores and obligations as tools by which we can discover new happiness. Ranging from Internet culture to moral philosophy, from ancient poetics to modern consumerism, Play Anything reveals how today’s chaotic world can only be tamed—and enjoyed—when we first impose boundaries on ourselves."
book  play  games  philosophy 
may 2018 by tsuomela
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