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Saving the heartland: Place-based policies in 21st Century America
"America’s regional disparities are large and regional convergence has declined if not disappeared. This wildly uneven economic landscape calls for a new look at spatially targeted policies. There are three plausible justifications for place-based policies–agglomeration economies, spatial equity and larger marginal returns to targeting social distress in high distress areas. The second justification is stronger than the first and the third justification is stronger than the second. The enormous social costs of non-employment suggests that fighting long-term joblessness is more important than fighting income inequality. Stronger tools, such as spatially targeted employment credits, may be needed in West Virginia than in San Francisco."
economics  policy 
march 2018 by tsuomela
Welcome to the Open Source Policy Center | OSPC
"Policymakers increasingly rely on computational models to predict the budgetary and broader economic impacts of current and proposed policies, especially those involving taxes and entitlements. Estimates from these models often determine a bill’s success or failure in the legislative process and public sphere. The Open Source Policy Center's first focus is supporting community-driven projects that analyze the budgetary and broader economic impact of taxes. These models are completely transparent and freely available to researchers across the country. OSPC also provides an easy-to-use online interface that allows students, policymakers, journalists, and informed citizens to interact with the models and learn for themselves about the effects of policies."
policy  simulation  open-source  think-tank 
november 2017 by tsuomela
Twilight of theNudges | New Republic
"THE ETHICS OF INFLUENCE: GOVERNMENT IN THE AGE OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE by Cass R. Sunstein Cambridge University Press , 234 pp., $29.99"
book  review  nudge  psychology  persuasion  policy  government  influence 
october 2016 by tsuomela
Memorandum of Understanding Collection
"The Digital Humanities Liaison (Rafia Mirza), Director of Scholarly Communication (Brett Currier), and The Research Data Librarian (Peace Ossom Williamson) have developed a workbook for the use of Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in Libraries. We have developed a MOU template to apply to large scale collaborative projects. We have found that this workflow and management has assisted the library with organizational commitment, identifying hiccups and limitations before starting the project, and priority evaluation with competing projects. Because the shift from transactional work to long term projects is happening in many libraries, The MOU team has created a workbook available through ResearchCommons. This collection includes a general MOU template, templates for particular projects, a workflow, and instructions for each. "
libraries  policy  examples  mou 
june 2016 by tsuomela
Modsti | Modeling Science, Technology & Innovation Conference
"This NSF-funded, agenda-setting conference will review opportunities and challenges associated with the usage of mathematical, statistical, and computational models in science, technology, and innovation (STI) in decision making. Among others, STI models can be employed to simulate the diffusion of ideas and experts, to estimate the impact of population explosion and aging, to explore alternative funding schemas, or to communicate the probable outcomes of different policy decisions."
conference  science  policy  modeling 
june 2016 by tsuomela
Science.gc.ca - Data Management
"The three federal research funding agencies – the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) – are committed to fostering a robust environment for data stewardship in Canada and internationally, and to helping ensure that Canada is well positioned to contribute to and capitalize on data-intensive science and scholarship. To achieve this, and while recognizing the diversity of data practices and needs within the Canadian research community, the agencies are in the process of reviewing and enhancing their data management requirements for agency-supported researchers. As a step in this process, the agencies have developed the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management (the Statement). This builds on the 2013 consultation document, Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada, information provided by a Comprehensive Brief on Research Data Management Policies, and advice received through stakeholder engagement. The agencies sought feedback from the research community in summer 2015 on a draft version of the Statement."
research-data  management  country(Canada)  funding  government  policy 
june 2016 by tsuomela
Someone Has to Fail — David F. Labaree | Harvard University Press
"What do we really want from schools? Only everything, in all its contradictions. Most of all, we want access and opportunity for all children—but all possible advantages for our own. So argues historian David Labaree in this provocative look at the way “this archetype of dysfunction works so well at what we want it to do even as it evades what we explicitly ask it to do.” Ever since the common school movement of the nineteenth century, mass schooling has been seen as an essential solution to great social problems. Yet as wave after wave of reform movements have shown, schools are extremely difficult to change. Labaree shows how the very organization of the locally controlled, administratively limited school system makes reform difficult. At the same time, he argues, the choices of educational consumers have always overwhelmed top-down efforts at school reform. Individual families seek to use schools for their own purposes—to pursue social opportunity, if they need it, and to preserve social advantage, if they have it. In principle, we want the best for all children. In practice, we want the best for our own. Provocative, unflinching, wry, Someone Has to Fail looks at the way that unintended consequences of consumer choices have created an extraordinarily resilient educational system, perpetually expanding, perpetually unequal, constantly being reformed, and never changing much."
book  publisher  school  education  purpose  policy  politics 
october 2015 by tsuomela
Change of State | The MIT Press
"As the informational state replaces the bureaucratic welfare state, control over information creation, processing, flows, and use has become the most effective form of power. In Change of State Sandra Braman examines the theoretical and practical ramifications of this "change of state." She looks at the ways in which governments are deliberate, explicit, and consistent in their use of information policy to exercise power, exploring not only such familiar topics as intellectual property rights and privacy but also areas in which policy is highly effective but little understood. Such lesser-known issues include hybrid citizenship, the use of "functionally equivalent borders" internally to allow exceptions to U.S. law, research funding, census methods, and network interconnection. Trends in information policy, argues Braman, both manifest and trigger change in the nature of governance itself.After laying the theoretical, conceptual, and historical foundations for understanding the informational state, Braman examines 20 information policy principles found in the U.S Constitution. She then explores the effects of U.S. information policy on the identity, structure, borders, and change processes of the state itself and on the individuals, communities, and organizations that make up the state. Looking across the breadth of the legal system, she presents current law as well as trends in and consequences of several information policy issues in each category affected. Change of State introduces information policy on two levels, coupling discussions of specific contemporary problems with more abstract analysis drawing on social theory and empirical research as well as law. Most important, the book provides a way of understanding how information policy brings about the fundamental social changes that come with the transformation to the informational state."
book  publisher  information  policy  governance  government  law  social  state 
september 2015 by tsuomela
Librarian of PROgress
Advocacy for the next Librarian of Congress.
LibraryOfCongress  future  policy 
september 2015 by tsuomela
Atlanta Conference |
"The Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy provides a showcase for the highest quality scholarship addressing the multidimensional challenges and interrelated characteristics of science and innovation policy and processes."
science  policy  innovation  conference  academic 
february 2015 by tsuomela
www.whitehouse.gov
May 2014 report from the Executive Office of the President
big-data  government  report  policy  privacy  values  opportunity 
september 2014 by tsuomela
A balancing act: The ideal and the realistic in developing Dryad’s preservation policy | Mannheimer | First Monday
"Data preservation has gained momentum and visibility in connection with the growth in digital data and data sharing policies. The Dryad Repository, a curated general–purpose repository for preserving and sharing the data underlying scientific publications, has taken steps to develop a preservation policy to ensure the long–term persistence of this archived data. In 2013, a Preservation Working Group, consisting of Dryad staff and national and international experts in data management and preservation, was convened to guide the development of a preservation policy. This paper describes the policy development process, outcomes, and lessons learned in the process. To meet Dryad’s specific needs, Dryad’s preservation policy negotiates between the ideal and the realistic, including complying with broader governing policies, matching current practices, and working within system constraints."
data-curation  preservation  repository  online  policy 
august 2014 by tsuomela
Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research | The White House
"The Obama Administration is committed to the proposition that citizens deserve easy access to the results of scientific research their tax dollars have paid for. That’s why, in a policy memorandum released today, OSTP Director John Holdren has directed Federal agencies with more than $100M in R&D expenditures to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication and requiring researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research. OSTP has been looking into this issue for some time, soliciting broad public input on multiple occasions and convening an interagency working group to develop a policy. The final policy reflects substantial inputs from scientists and scientific organizations, publishers, members of Congress, and other members of the public—over 65 thousand of whom recently signed a We the People petition asking for expanded public access to the results of taxpayer-funded research."
science  government  federal  policy  data-curation  access  data  management 
august 2014 by tsuomela
Rich people rule!
"A forthcoming article in Perspectives on Politics by (my former colleague) Martin Gilens and (my sometime collaborator) Benjamin Page marks a notable step in that process. Drawing on the same extensive evidence employed by Gilens in his landmark book “Affluence and Influence,” Gilens and Page analyze 1,779 policy outcomes over a period of more than 20 years. They conclude that “economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence.”"
politics  rich  money  policy  political-science  oligarchy 
april 2014 by tsuomela
The Alliance for Useful Evidence
"The Alliance for Useful Evidence champions the use of evidence in social policy and practice.  We are an open–access network of 1,000 individuals from across government, universities, charities, business and local authorities in the UK and internationally."
communication  research  scholarly-communication  policy  government  think-tank  evidence 
september 2013 by tsuomela
WonkComms | What is the future for think tank and research communications?
"The strategies, channels and tools used to communicate research are in flux. All over the world, communications teams in think tanks and research organisations are hitting on great ideas and innovations. These innovations are helping their research to be heard, found and acted upon by existing and new audiences. Though many blogs and sites exist that discuss research communications, nowhere is there a space for communications staff working within research institutions to share their practical experiences implementing revolutionary and evolutionary change using digital tools. There is no way for research communicators to connect with and discuss exciting innovations with others just like them, and learn from their peers."
communication  research  scholarly-communication  policy  government  think-tank 
september 2013 by tsuomela
The Policy and Internet Blog | Understanding public policy online
"This blog investigates the relationship between the Internet and public policy. It covers work by the Oxford Internet Institute, and work published in its journal Policy & Internet (Wiley-Blackwell)."
weblog-group  policy  internet  governance 
july 2013 by tsuomela
The Center for Science and Democracy | Union of Concerned Scientists
"Strengthening American democracy by advancing the essential role of science, evidence-based decision making, and constructive debate as a means to improve the health, security, and prosperity of all people."
government  science  democracy  decision-making  policy 
may 2013 by tsuomela
www.ostina.org
"In any discussion of government science policies, it rarely seems to take long for someone to invoke the notion of "basic research." "
science  policy  research  basic-research  definition  history  terminology  sts  communication  rhetoric 
october 2012 by tsuomela
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