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tsuomela : problem-solving   27

Human Computation Institute | Collective solutions to societal problems
"The Human Computation Institute is an independent, non-profit, innovation center, founded in 2014, where human computation specialists partner with mission-aligned benefactors, world-class domain experts, and on-the-ground implementers to engineer and deploy crowd-powered solutions to challenging societal problems."
human-computation  crowdsourcing  citizen-science  problem-solving  non-profit  research  consulting 
january 2015 by tsuomela
Home - Climate CoLab
"The goal of the Climate CoLab is to harness the collective intelligence of thousands of people from all around the world to address global climate change. Inspired by systems like Wikipedia and Linux, the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence has developed this on-line forum where citizens create, analyze, and select detailed proposals for what to do about climate change."
climate  environment  climate-change  problem-solving  distributed  cognition  crowdsourcing  groups  competition 
may 2013 by tsuomela
The cuckoo clock syndrome : addicted to command, allergic to leadership - WRAP: Warwick Research Archive Portal
This article considers the extent to which we are addicted to particular ways of configuring the world and responding in a culturally appropriate way. It suggests that the original Tame and Wicked problems typology of Rittell and Webber (1973) can be usefully expanded to provide a heuristic for explaining this addiction and then focuses upon the most common approach an addiction to Crisis and Command. Some likely explanations for this addiction are discussed and some illustrative examples provided. It concludes that not only does our predilection for Crisis and Command undermine our attempts to address Wicked problems adequately, but also that 'Leadership' (defined as persuading the collective to take responsibility for collective problems) is often regarded not just as difficult and dangerous, but as the enemy of the people'. We are, then, not only likely to be addicted to Command but also likely to be allergic to leadership.
problems  problem-solving  wicked-problems  understanding  solutions  culture  hierarchy  future  leadership 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Official Google Blog: What’s your X? Amplifying technology moonshots
The Solve for X gathering, which we co-hosted with Eric Schmidt, is a place to celebrate a concept we champion internally and that we believe will inspire many others: technology moonshots. These are efforts that take on global-scale problems, define radical solutions to those problems, and involve some form of breakthrough technology that could actually make them happen. Moonshots live in the gray area between audacious projects and pure science fiction
future  problem-solving  goals 
february 2012 by tsuomela
Global Futures Studies
"The Millennium Project was founded in 1996 after a three-year feasibility study with the United Nations University, Smithsonian Institution, Futures Group International, and the American Council for the UNU. It is now an independent non-profit global participatory futures research think tank of futurists, scholars, business planners, and policy makers who work for international organizations, governments, corporations, NGOs, and universities. The Millennium Project manages a coherent and cumulative process that collects and assesses judgments from over 2,500 people since the beginning of the project selected by its 40 Nodes around the world. The work is distilled in its annual "State of the Future", "Futures Research Methodology" series, and special studies."
future  futures  research  scenario  planning  wicked-problems  problem-solving  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Our Eucatastrophe - Charlie's Diary
"Remember when I said in our last post that our problems are no longer technological? What I meant was that developing the technologies we need to save our collective asses is no longer the big issue
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science  social-media 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Wicked (2) - Charlie's Diary
"Why is it even possible to have misunderstandings online when we have all these tools at hand to help prevent them? It's because social media systems like Facebook are just the tricycle version of what social media will become. Facebook barely hints at what's coming
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science  social-media 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Wicked (1) - Charlie's Diary
"Here's my take on things: our biggest challenges are no longer technological. They are issues of communication, coordination, and cooperation. These are, for the most part, well-studied problems that are not wicked. The methodologies that solve them need to be scaled up from the small-group settings where they currently work well, and injected into the DNA of our society--or, at least, built into our default modes of using the internet. They then can be used to tackle the wicked problems."
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence 
august 2011 by tsuomela
What Is Academic Work? - NYTimes.com
"After it was all over, everyone pronounced the occasion a great success
academia  work  labor  interdisciplinary  definition  academic  problem-solving  understanding 
march 2011 by tsuomela
Big-Tent Problems « Easily Distracted
So here’s one thing I was thinking about: what intellectual issues and questions by their nature require discussion between a very heterogenous group of disciplines and intellects for innovative solutions or some kind of forward motion to emerge?

Almost any problem or question could probably benefit from having more than one perspective or angle devoted to it, but for many academic questions or policy problems, the natural range of useful contributions ought to be fairly narrow....I’m focused here just on intellectual and applied problems where heterogeneity in methods, bodies of knowledge and perspective are a requirement for progress. A few examples, and I’d be glad to hear of more along these lines: SETI, artificial intelligence, economic development, education, cultural creation
dialogue  problem-solving  diversity  ideas  idea-generation 
june 2010 by tsuomela
Philosophy is Back in Business - BusinessWeek
When I say we need to return to a philosophical approach in relation to problem-solving, I mean that we need to broaden our understanding of problems by looking deeper at our own beliefs, values, ethics, and character, and then understand how they relate to those of others who share a stake in our problem-solving efforts.
business  philosophy  ethics  problem-solving 
january 2010 by tsuomela
Matthew Yglesias » More Serious Friday Nordic Blogging
But even though I don’t think anyone would really dispute any of that, we don’t just do that stuff. Instead, we’re trapped in a frustrating circle of passive acceptance of the idea that we just have to live in a country where public services are ill-funded and poorly delivered. And it’s not just that conservatives block reforms — progressives have let their horizons slip incredibly low. A country that once built transcontinental railroads and sent people to the moon has decided that for some reason it’d just be impossible to solve our current social problems.
politics  goals  inequality  social  government  imagination  problem-solving 
december 2008 by tsuomela
Open the Future: Long-Run vs. Long-Lag
Here's a simple example of a long-run problem: You're driving a car in a straight line, and the map indicates a cliff in the distance. You can change direction now, or you can change direction as the cliff looms, and either way you avoid the cliff. If you know that there's a turn-off ahead, you may keep driving towards the cliff until you get to your preferred exit.

The practice of waiting until the long-term becomes the near-term is less effective, however, for the other kind of distant problem: Let's call them "long-lag problems." With long-lag problems, there's a significant distance between cause and effect, for both the problem and any attempted solution. The available time to head-off the problem doesn't stretch from now until when the problem manifests
problem-solving  wicked-problems  future  long-term  long-lag  psychology 
october 2008 by tsuomela

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