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tsuomela : profession   17

Taiga Forum | Challenging boundaries in academic libraries
"Taiga’s goal is to build a robust community of practice for senior academic library leaders who cross traditional organizational boundaries to focus on creating the future within our organizations. Whether your leadership portfolio includes digital libraries, technical services, public services, information technology, e-research, scholarly communications or collection development, Taiga welcomes all Assistant/Associate University Librarians; Assistant/Associate Deans or Directors; Chief Technology Strategists, or similarly-ranked staff to join the Taiga community. Taiga sponsors annual forums, informal discussions and social networking opportunities at professional meetings; and an engaging online community. Come join our conversations!"
libraries  library  culture  profession  change 
august 2014 by tsuomela
Archives Don't Matter | AVPreserve
"Archival Environments matter because they help support the longevity of discovery and access, but if that access to playable content is not provided the nominal archive is remiss in its duties. Until such time as that duty is met we cannot rightfully distinguish between or value the role of the traditional archive over the lay archive of something like a YouTube merely on the tenets of description, storage, and best practices alone."
archives  philosophy  purpose  profession  laypeople  utility 
february 2013 by tsuomela
Study Hacks » Blog Archive » Impact Algorithms: Strategies Remarkable People Use to Accomplish Remarkable Things
"I’ve been writing recently about the impact instinct — the ability to consistently steer your work somewhere remarkable. We know that diligently focusing on a single general direction and then applying deliberate practice to systematically become more skilled, are both crucial for standing out. But true remarkability seems to also require this extra push."
gtd  success  impact  profession  graduate-school  advice 
june 2012 by tsuomela
U.S. Intellectual History: How -- And For Whom -- We Write
"But while I certainly want academic history to continue valuing clear, non-technical prose, I also think we should try to have a more realistic sense of who we reach and how we reach them. The myth of accessible academic history has its costs as well as its benefits.

To begin with, the myth of accessibility can devalue some of what academic historians do uniquely well. We produce knowledge about the past regardless of whether there is a mass market for the knowledge we produce. And since I don't believe that the mass market does a good job of determining what's worth knowing, I think we ought to moderate our polemics against specialization. Many good ideas--even ideas that eventually have a profound impact on broad, public conversations--start in abstruse corners of academic work. Think, for example, of Kuhn and the idea of a "paradigm shift.""
history  profession  outreach  audience  public-understanding  writing  academic  specialization  access  tone 
april 2012 by tsuomela
AHA Today: Debating "Professional Boredom" in History
"In his article “Professional Boredom” in the March 2012 issue of Perspectives on History, AHA President William Cronon discussed what it means to be a “professional historian” and advocated for history writing that’s engaging and accessible to a broad audience. His article generated numerous insightful responses and discussions online, and today we highlight a few."
history  profession  outreach  audience  public-understanding 
april 2012 by tsuomela
Too Smart to Fail: Notes on an Age of Folly | | Notebook | The Baffler
"Of course there was a place where ideas weren’t simply for sale, I thought: the professions. Ethical standards kept professionals independent of their clients’ gross pecuniary interests.

These days, though, I’m not so sure. Money has transformed every watchdog, every independent authority. Medical doctors are increasingly gulled by the lobbying of pharmaceutical salesmen. Accountants were no match for Enron. Corporate boards are rubber stamps. Hospitals break unions, and, with an eye toward future donations, electronically single out rich patients for more luxurious treatment.
economics  profession  expertise  money  corruption  capitalism 
march 2012 by tsuomela
Thomas Frank: How Americans Have Gotten Played -- Over and Over and Over Again | News
"Of course there was a place where ideas weren’t simply for sale, I thought: the professions. Ethical standards kept professionals independent of their clients’ gross pecuniary interests.

These days, though, I’m not so sure. Money has transformed every watchdog, every independent authority. Medical doctors are increasingly gulled by the lobbying of pharmaceutical salesmen. Accountants were no match for Enron. Corporate boards are rubber stamps. Hospitals break unions, and, with an eye toward future donations, electronically single out rich patients for more luxurious treatment."
economics  profession  expertise  money  corruption 
march 2012 by tsuomela

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