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tsuomela : propaganda   153

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The Revolution That Wasn’t — Jen Schradie | Harvard University Press
"This surprising study of online political mobilization shows that money and organizational sophistication influence politics online as much as off, and casts doubt on the democratizing power of digital activism. The internet has been hailed as a leveling force that is reshaping activism. From the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter and #MeToo, digital activism seemed cheap, fast, and open to all. Now this celebratory narrative finds itself competing with an increasingly sinister story as platforms like Facebook and Twitter—once the darlings of digital democracy—are on the defensive for their role in promoting fake news. While hashtag activism captures headlines, conservative digital activism is proving more effective on the ground. In this sharp-eyed and counterintuitive study, Jen Schradie shows how the web has become another weapon in the arsenal of the powerful. She zeroes in on workers’ rights advocacy in North Carolina and finds a case study with broad implications. North Carolina’s hard-right turn in the early 2010s should have alerted political analysts to the web’s antidemocratic potential: amid booming online organizing, one of the country’s most closely contested states elected the most conservative government in North Carolina’s history. The Revolution That Wasn’t identifies the reasons behind this previously undiagnosed digital-activism gap. Large hierarchical political organizations with professional staff can amplify their digital impact, while horizontally organized volunteer groups tend to be less effective at translating online goodwill into meaningful action. Not only does technology fail to level the playing field, it tilts it further, so that only the most sophisticated and well-funded players can compete."
book  publisher  social-media  internet  activism  resources  influence  propaganda 
june 2019 by tsuomela
Yes, It Was That Bad : Democracy Journal
"Network Propaganda: Manipulation, Disinformation, and Radicalization in American Politics By Yochai Benkler, Robert Faros, and Hal Roberts • Oxford University Press • 2018 • 472 pages • $27.95 Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President By Kathleen Hall Jamieson • Oxford University Press • 2018 • 314 pages • $24.95"
books  review  election  2016  media-studies  social-media  propaganda  politics  communication 
march 2019 by tsuomela
Science’s Freedom Fighters - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Freedom’s Laboratory The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science By Audra J. Wolfe Published 11.18.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 312 Pages"
book  review  sts  science  history  cold-war  propaganda 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Misinformation and Mass Audiences Edited by Brian G. Southwell, Emily A. Thorson, and Laura Sheble
"Addressing one of the most important but least-reported aspects of mass communication, this timely volume considers both the perils of misinformation and the possibilities for remedying its detrimental effects."
book  publisher  propaganda  misinformation 
november 2017 by tsuomela
The Future of Free Speech, Trolls, Anonymity and Fake News Online | Pew Research Center
"Many experts fear uncivil and manipulative behaviors on the internet will persist – and may get worse. This will lead to a splintering of social media into AI-patrolled and regulated ‘safe spaces’ separated from free-for-all zones. Some worry this will hurt the open exchange of ideas and compromise privacy"
online  trolling  behavior  social-media  propaganda 
june 2017 by tsuomela
How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction, not Engaged Argument | Gary King
"The Chinese government has long been suspected of hiring as many as 2,000,000 people to surreptitiously insert huge numbers of pseudonymous and other deceptive writings into the stream of real social media posts, as if they were the genuine opinions of ordinary people. Many academics, and most journalists and activists, claim that these so-called "50c party" posts vociferously argue for the government's side in political and policy debates. As we show, this is also true of the vast majority of posts openly accused on social media of being 50c. Yet, almost no systematic empirical evidence exists for this claim, or, more importantly, for the Chinese regime's strategic objective in pursuing this activity. In the first large scale empirical analysis of this operation, we show how to identify the secretive authors of these posts, the posts written by them, and their content. We estimate that the government fabricates and posts about 448 million social media comments a year. In contrast to prior claims, we show that the Chinese regime's strategy is to avoid arguing with skeptics of the party and the government, and to not even discuss controversial issues. We infer that the goal of this massive secretive operation is instead to regularly distract the public and change the subject, as most of the these posts involve cheerleading for China, the revolutionary history of the Communist Party, or other symbols of the regime. We discuss how these results fit with what is known about the Chinese censorship program, and suggest how they may change our broader theoretical understanding of "common knowledge" and information control in authoritarian regimes."
information  propaganda  political-science  country(China) 
january 2017 by tsuomela
Take the time and effort to correct misinformation : Nature News & Comment
"Scientists should challenge online falsehoods and inaccuracies — and harness the collective power of the Internet to fight back, argues Phil Williamson."
science  communication  online  public-understanding  misinformation  propaganda  climate-change 
december 2016 by tsuomela
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