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Three Times - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Argument over What Makes Living Things Tick By Jessica Riskin Published 03.10.2016 University Of Chicago Press 544 Pages Reading and the Making of Time in the Eighteenth Century By Christina Lupton Published 08.15.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 216 Pages Feeling Time Duration, the Novel, and Eighteenth-Century Sensibility By Amit S. Yahav Published 05.08.2018 University of Pennsylvania Press 208 Pages"
books  reviews  time  experience  reading  science 
11 weeks ago by tsuomela
Dear Reader, Are You Reading? - The Scholarly Kitchen
"MaryAnne Wolf’s Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World (2018) "
book  review  reading  psychology  cognitive-science 
october 2018 by tsuomela
On Public Intellectuals: From the Talmud to Judith Butler — Crooked Timber
"When we talk about public intellectuals, not only are we talking about the audience as a recipient or reader of the text, but we are also, necessarily, talking about the audience as an independent, autonomous, and equally original and creative, co-creator of the text."
public  intellectual  public-intellectual  audience  critical-theory  philosophy  reading  co-creation 
july 2016 by tsuomela
The History of “Loving” to Read - The New Yorker
Review of Loving Literature: A Cultural History by Dedre Shauna Lynch
book  review  reading  emotion  history 
february 2015 by tsuomela
BIBLIOTHECA by Adam Lewis Greene — Kickstarter
"The Biblical Literature designed & crafted for reading, separated into four elegant volumes, and free of all numbers, notes, etc."
kickstarter  bible  reading  books 
july 2014 by tsuomela
New Statesman | Living life by the book: why reading isn't always good for you
"Somewhere along the line, an orthodoxy hardened: cigarettes will kill you and Bon Jovi will give you a migraine, but reading – the ideal diet being Shakespeare and 19th-century novels, plus the odd modernist – will make you healthier, stronger, kinder. But is that true?"
reading  psychology  benefits 
march 2014 by tsuomela
well.blogs.nytimes.com
"That is the conclusion of a study published Thursday in the journal Science. It found that after reading literary fiction, as opposed to popular fiction or serious nonfiction, people performed better on tests measuring empathy, social perception and emotional intelligence — skills that come in especially handy when you are trying to read someone’s body language or gauge what they might be thinkin"
psychology  literature  fiction  reading  empathy  personality 
october 2013 by tsuomela
well.blogs.nytimes.com
"Reading Chekhov for a few minutes makes you better at decoding what other people are feeling. But spending the same amount of time with a potboiler by Danielle Steel does not have the same effect, scientists reported Thursday."
psychology  literature  fiction  reading  empathy  personality 
october 2013 by tsuomela
Study: Reading Fiction Makes People Comfortable With Ambiguity
"Are you uncomfortable with ambiguity? It’s a common condition, but a highly problematic one. The compulsion to quell that unease can inspire snap judgments, rigid thinking, and bad decision-making. Fortunately, new research suggests a simple antidote for this affliction: Read more literary fiction."
reading  psychology  ambiguity  literature  empathy  emotion  learning 
june 2013 by tsuomela
'Social Reading' Projects Bring Commentary Into the Text - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education
Work by Stephen Duncombe. "The result of his sabbatical labors has just gone live. Called Open Utopia, it's a free, online version of Thomas More's Utopia that anyone can browse—and annotate. An example of what's sometimes called social reading, Open Utopia builds on the idea that a book doesn't have to be a static text. Online, a book can be a gathering place, a shared space where readers record their reactions and conversations. Those interactions ultimately become part of the book too, a kind of amplified marginalia."
digital-humanities  reading  social  social-computing  online  interaction  utopia 
november 2012 by tsuomela
The Results Are in: Scientists Are Workaholics | Wired Science | Wired.com
"In a recent study, a team of scientists in China examined the time of day when paper downloads occur from a scientific publisher’s website. Controlling for the time zone where the request originated, they were able to see how hard scientists work overall by examining the downloads for a period of a little over a week. But even more than that, they explored the patterns in their work habits, as well differences between scientists in different countries."
work  labor  habit  scientists  publishing  reading  analytics 
august 2012 by tsuomela
To Read All Of The Privacy Policies You Encounter, You'd Need To Take A Month Off From Work Each Year | Techdirt
In fact, a new report notes that if you actually bothered to read all the privacy policies you encounter on a daily basis, it would take you 250 working hours per year -- or about 30 workdays.
privacy  internet  policies  research  time  reading 
april 2012 by tsuomela
Mysterious paper sculptures - Central Station Blog post
Those of you who don't keep up with Edinburgh's literary world through Twitter may have missed the recent spate of mysterious paper sculptures appearing around the city. Annotated link http://www.diigo.com/bookmark/http://community.thisiscentralstation.com/_Mysterious-paper-sculptures/blog/4991767/126249.html
books  paper  libraries  sculpture  library  reading  art  mystery  donation 
september 2011 by tsuomela
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