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tsuomela : science   1778

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What if Darwin’s ideas about competition aren’t as correct as we’ve long thought?
"Scientists are slowly understanding collaboration’s role in biology, which might just help liberate our collective imagination in time to better address the climate crisis."
evolution  cooperation  biology  science  public-understanding 
24 days ago by tsuomela
blog.ayjay.org
"What follows is a review of The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Argument over What Makes Living Things Tick, by Jessica Riskin (University of Chicago Press, 2016)."
book  review  biology  science  history  sts  philosophy  reductionism 
10 weeks ago by tsuomela
What Makes Science Trustworthy | Boston Review
"Why Trust Science? Naomi Oreskes, with Ottmar Edenhofer, Martin Kowarsch, Jon A. Krosnick, Marc Lange, Susan Lindee, and Stephen Macedo Princeton University Press, $24.95 (cloth)"
book  review  science  philosophy  trust  agnotology 
november 2019 by tsuomela
Is Science Political? | Boston Review
"Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science Audra J. Wolfe Johns Hopkins University Press, $29.95 (cloth)"
book  review  science  america  history  cold-war 
august 2019 by tsuomela
www.hup.harvard.edu
"From a journalist and former lab researcher, a penetrating investigation of the explosion in cases of scientific fraud and the factors behind it. In the 1970s, a scientific scandal about painted mice hit the headlines. A cancer researcher was found to have deliberately falsified his experiments by coloring transplanted mouse skin with ink. This widely publicized case of scientific misconduct marked the beginning of an epidemic of fraud that plagues the scientific community today. From manipulated results and made-up data to retouched illustrations and plagiarism, cases of scientific fraud have skyrocketed in the past two decades, especially in the biomedical sciences. Fraud in the Lab examines cases of scientific misconduct around the world and asks why this behavior is so pervasive. Nicolas Chevassus-au-Louis points to large-scale trends that have led to an environment of heightened competition, extreme self-interest, and emphasis on short-term payoffs. Because of the move toward highly specialized research, fewer experts are qualified to verify experimental findings. And the pace of journal publishing has exacerbated the scientific rewards system—publish or perish holds sway more than ever. Even when instances of misconduct are discovered, researchers often face few consequences, and falsified data may continue to circulate after an article has been retracted. Sharp and damning, this exposé details the circumstances that have allowed scientific standards to decline. Fraud in the Lab reveals the intense social pressures that lead to fraud, documents the lasting impact it has had on the scientific community, and highlights recent initiatives and proposals to reduce the extent of misconduct in the futu"
science  methodology  fraud  competition 
august 2019 by tsuomela
Three Times - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Argument over What Makes Living Things Tick By Jessica Riskin Published 03.10.2016 University Of Chicago Press 544 Pages Reading and the Making of Time in the Eighteenth Century By Christina Lupton Published 08.15.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 216 Pages Feeling Time Duration, the Novel, and Eighteenth-Century Sensibility By Amit S. Yahav Published 05.08.2018 University of Pennsylvania Press 208 Pages"
books  reviews  time  experience  reading  science 
july 2019 by tsuomela
[1904.04736] Cold Storage Data Archives: More Than Just a Bunch of Tapes
"The abundance of available sensor and derived data from large scientific experiments, such as earth observation programs, radio astronomy sky surveys, and high-energy physics already exceeds the storage hardware globally fabricated per year. To that end, cold storage data archives are the---often overlooked---spearheads of modern big data analytics in scientific, data-intensive application domains. While high-performance data analytics has received much attention from the research community, the growing number of problems in designing and deploying cold storage archives has only received very little attention. In this paper, we take the first step towards bridging this gap in knowledge by presenting an analysis of four real-world cold storage archives from three different application domains. In doing so, we highlight (i) workload characteristics that differentiate these archives from traditional, performance-sensitive data analytics, (ii) design trade-offs involved in building cold storage systems for these archives, and (iii) deployment trade-offs with respect to migration to the public cloud. Based on our analysis, we discuss several other important research challenges that need to be addressed by the data management community. "
archives  data-curation  big-data  science  computational-science 
april 2019 by tsuomela
How to Disappear by Akiko Busch | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books
"Vivid, surprising, and utterly timely, Akiko Busch’s HOW TO DISAPPEAR explores the idea of invisibility in nature, art, and science, in search of a more joyful and peaceful way of living in today’s increasingly surveilled and publicity-obsessed world In our increasingly networked and image-saturated lives, the notion of disappearing has never been both more enchanting and yet fanciful. Today, we are relentlessly encouraged, even conditioned, to reveal, share, and self-promote. The pressure to be public comes not just from our peers, but vast and pervasive technology companies, which want to profit from patterns in our behavior. A lifelong student and observer of the natural world, Busch sets out to explore her own uneasiness with this arrangement, and what she senses is a widespread desire for a less scrutinized way of life–for invisibility. Writing in rich painterly detail about her own life, her family, and some of the world’s most exotic and remote places–from the Cayman Islands to Iceland–she savors the pleasures of being unseen. Discovering and dramatizing a wonderful range of ways of disappearing, from virtual reality goggles that trick the wearer into believing her body has disappeared and to the way Virginia Woolf’s fictional Mrs. Dalloway feels a flickering of personhood as an older woman, Busch deliberates on subjects new and old with equal sensitivity and incisiveness."
book  publisher  invisible  art  science  experience 
february 2019 by tsuomela
Science’s Freedom Fighters - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Freedom’s Laboratory The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science By Audra J. Wolfe Published 11.18.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 312 Pages"
book  review  sts  science  history  cold-war  propaganda 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Chambers, C.: The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices, and sometimes even fraud. The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions to ensure that it remains a legitimate and reliable science in the years ahead. In this unflinchingly candid manifesto, Chris Chambers draws on his own experiences as a working scientist to reveal a dark side to psychology that few of us ever see. Using the seven deadly sins as a metaphor, he shows how practitioners are vulnerable to powerful biases that undercut the scientific method, how they routinely torture data until it produces outcomes that can be published in prestigious journals, and how studies are much less reliable than advertised. He reveals how a culture of secrecy denies the public and other researchers access to the results of psychology experiments, how fraudulent academics can operate with impunity, and how an obsession with bean counting creates perverse incentives for academics. Left unchecked, these problems threaten the very future of psychology as a science—but help is here. Outlining a core set of best practices that can be applied across the sciences, Chambers demonstrates how all these sins can be corrected by embracing open science, an emerging philosophy that seeks to make research and its outcomes as transparent as possible."
book  publisher  psychology  social-science  science  replication 
october 2018 by tsuomela
Big data: are we making a big mistake?
Very good description of the problems that big data claims to solve, but may not actually solve.
big-data  statistics  science 
march 2018 by tsuomela
MPSOpenData
"Funded by the National Science Foundation, this workshop series will generate discipline-specific responses from the Mathematical and Physical Sciences research communities to the federal policy requiring open data and the recently-released NSF policy statement on open data. In order to decide how and what to preserve for public consumption, and in what manner the data will be stored and accessed, a series of dialogues is required. Discussions within individual disciplines must reach a consensus on data preservation procedures and data access guidelines consistent with discipline-specific expectations for data re-use, access policies, and the level of burden implied by conservation that is placed on the individual investigator."
open-data  open-research  mathematics  science  physical  workshops  report 
september 2017 by tsuomela
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