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tsuomela : success   149

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Frank, R.H.: Success and Luck: Good Fortune and the Myth of Meritocracy (Hardcover, Paperback and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"How important is luck in economic success? No question more reliably divides conservatives from liberals. As conservatives correctly observe, people who amass great fortunes are almost always talented and hardworking. But liberals are also correct to note that countless others have those same qualities yet never earn much. In recent years, social scientists have discovered that chance plays a much larger role in important life outcomes than most people imagine. In Success and Luck, bestselling author and New York Times economics columnist Robert Frank explores the surprising implications of those findings to show why the rich underestimate the importance of luck in success—and why that hurts everyone, even the wealthy. Frank describes how, in a world increasingly dominated by winner-take-all markets, chance opportunities and trivial initial advantages often translate into much larger ones—and enormous income differences—over time; how false beliefs about luck persist, despite compelling evidence against them; and how myths about personal success and luck shape individual and political choices in harmful ways. But, Frank argues, we could decrease the inequality driven by sheer luck by adopting simple, unintrusive policies that would free up trillions of dollars each year—more than enough to fix our crumbling infrastructure, expand healthcare coverage, fight global warming, and reduce poverty, all without requiring painful sacrifices from anyone. If this sounds implausible, you'll be surprised to discover that the solution requires only a few, noncontroversial steps."
book  publisher  meritocracy  merit  success  luck 
december 2017 by tsuomela
Know Your Competition
Interesting thoughts about 3 different levels of competition and which may easier or harder to make an impact at.
competition  success  metrics  gtd  productivity  work  goals  goal-setting 
december 2017 by tsuomela
Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science | The National Academies Press
"The past half-century has witnessed a dramatic increase in the scale and complexity of scientific research. The growing scale of science has been accompanied by a shift toward collaborative research, referred to as "team science." Scientific research is increasingly conducted by small teams and larger groups rather than individual investigators, but the challenges of collaboration can slow these teams' progress in achieving their scientific goals. How does a team-based approach work, and how can universities and research institutions support teams? Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science synthesizes and integrates the available research to provide guidance on assembling the science team; leadership, education and professional development for science teams and groups. It also examines institutional and organizational structures and policies to support science teams and identifies areas where further research is needed to help science teams and groups achieve their scientific and translational goals. This report offers major public policy recommendations for science research agencies and policymakers, as well as recommendations for individual scientists, disciplinary associations, and research universities. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science will be of interest to university research administrators, team science leaders, science faculty, and graduate and postdoctoral students."
book  publisher  science  teams  sts  success  effectiveness 
april 2015 by tsuomela
Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications
"Scientific research performed with the involvement of the broader public (the crowd) attracts increasing attention from scientists and policy makers. A key premise is that project organizers may be able to draw on underused human resources to advance research at relatively low cost. Despite a growing number of examples, systematic research on the effort contributions volunteers are willing to make to crowd science projects is lacking. Analyzing data on seven different projects, we quantify the financial value volunteers can bring by comparing their unpaid contributions with counterfactual costs in traditional or online labor markets. The volume of total contributions is substantial, although some projects are much more successful in attracting effort than others. Moreover, contributions received by projects are very uneven across time—a tendency toward declining activity is interrupted by spikes typically resulting from outreach efforts or media attention. Analyzing user-level data, we find that most contributors participate only once and with little effort, leaving a relatively small share of users who return responsible for most of the work. Although top contributor status is earned primarily through higher levels of effort, top contributors also tend to work faster. This speed advantage develops over multiple sessions, suggesting that it reflects learning rather than inherent differences in skills. Our findings inform recent discussions about potential benefits from crowd science, suggest that involving the crowd may be more effective for some kinds of projects than others, provide guidance for project managers, and raise important questions for future research."
citizen-science  crowdsourcing  participation  success  public-understanding  metrics  measurement 
january 2015 by tsuomela
Scribe Publications | What About Me?
"According to current thinking, anyone who fails to succeed must have something wrong with them. The pressure to achieve and be happy is taking a heavy toll, resulting in a warped view of the self, disorientation, and despair. People are lonelier than ever before. Today’s pay-for-performance mentality is turning institutions such as schools, universities, and hospitals into businesses, while individuals are being made to think of themselves as one-person enterprises. Love is increasingly hard to find, and we struggle to lead meaningful lives. In What about Me?, Paul Verhaeghe’s main concern is how social change has led to this psychic crisis and altered the way we think about ourselves. He investigates the effects of thirty years’ acceptance of neo-liberalism, free-market forces, and privatisation, and the resulting relationship between our engineered society and individual identity. It turns out that who we are is, as always, determined by the context in which we live."
book  publisher  markets  capitalism  success 
august 2014 by tsuomela
What Careerist Americans Can Learn From Ike, Dorothy Day and Jimmy Buffett - Conor Friedersdorf - The Atlantic
"The paraphrased quote, repeated during a meandering Wednesday conversation between David Brooks and Arianna Huffington, comes as close as any one statement can to distilling what the ideologically not-quite-opposites both regard as a flaw in the American psyche: we overvalue professional success, measured in money and power, and undervalue introspection and the life well-lived*"
american  culture  work  success  money  power  introspection  contemplation  values  medium-chill 
june 2013 by tsuomela
NOVA | Orchid Hunter | Great Amateurs in Science | PBS
"They are the nonprofessional scientists who every now and then make their professional counterparts green with envy for the enormous contributions they make to their discipline. Here, in no particular order, meet ten amateur scientists who secured such an enviable place in the history of science."
science  amateur  professional  success  citizen-science 
april 2013 by tsuomela
USGS Release: A Big Day for Science: Citizens Have Contributed One Million Observations to Top Nature Database (5/3/2012 9:00:00 AM)
"Thanks to citizen-scientists around the country, the USA National Phenology Network hit a major milestone this week by reaching its one millionth nature observation."
citizen-science  success  phenology  scale 
february 2013 by tsuomela
All About the Money - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education
""The Earning Power of Graduates From Tennessee's Colleges and Universities" is the latest effort to precisely quantify the value of a degree. It identifies the payoff that individual programs at specific colleges yield the first year after graduation. While limited to Tennessee, it will be followed by similar analyses in other states, and it marks the arrival of a new way of evaluating higher education that brings conversations about college productivity and performance to the program level."
education  economics  success  college  university  degree  academia  values  state(Tennessee) 
october 2012 by tsuomela
The Narrowing of the American Mind - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Wage studies that look only at the graduate's choice of major may well accelerate the narrowing of the American mind at the very moment in history when multidimensional learning—liberal learning—has become essential to success."
education  economics  success  college  university  degree  academia  values 
october 2012 by tsuomela
Early relationships, not brainpower, key to adult happiness
"The researchers found, on the one hand, a strong pathway from child and adolescent social connectedness to adult well-being. This illustrates the enduring significance of positive social relationships over the lifespan to adulthood. On the other hand, the pathway from early language development, through adolescent academic achievement, to adult well-being was weak, which is in line with existing research showing a lack of association between socioeconomic prosperity and happiness.

The analyses also suggest that the social and academic pathways are not intimately related to one another, and may be parallel paths."
psychology  happiness  children  adult  development  social-psychology  connection  academic  success 
august 2012 by tsuomela
Why Do Some Software Commons Succeed and Others Fail? | David Bollier
"The tech world frequently talks about open source software as a collaborative endeavor, but it is less apt to use the word “commons,” let alone engage in rigorous empirical analysis for understanding how software commons actually work. The arrival of Internet Success: A Study of Open-Source Software Commons (MIT Press) is therefore a welcome event. This book is the first large-scale empirical study to look at the social, technical and institutional aspects of free, libre and open source software (often known as “FLOSS”). It uses extensive firsthand survey research, statistical analysis and commons frameworks for studying this under-theorized realm."
book  review  open-source  intellectual-property  success  commons 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Los Angeles Review of Books - Envy, Or, The Last Infirmity
"Still, I want to distinguish, for I think there are differences — important differences — between workaday envy and what I'm calling artistic envy."
art  envy  success  genius  recognition  emotion 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Getting back on. Moodscope blog.
We can't be good at everything. My clarinet lessons didn't do much for me. I was always the last one to be picked for sports teams at school. There is something to be said for tenacity, however - for sticking at something through thick and thin - and to do this when it feels as if you are failing, I think you have to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again.
success  tenacity  Inspiration  talent 
july 2012 by tsuomela
The New Elitists - NYTimes.com
" The narrative of openness and talent obscures the bitter truth of the American experience. Talents are costly to develop, and we refuse to socialize these costs. To be an outstanding student requires not just smarts and dedication but a well-supported school, a safe, comfortable home and leisure time to cultivate the self. These are not widely available. When some students struggle, they can later tell the story of their triumph over adversity, often without mentioning the helping hand of a tutor. Other students simply fail without such expensive aids." Annotated link http://www.diigo.com/bookmark/http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/opinion/sunday/the-new-elitists.html
elites  class  economics  ability  success  luck  talent  inequality 
july 2012 by tsuomela
The Gervais Principle, Or The Office According to “The Office”
"Until now, that is. Now, after four years, I’ve finally figured the show out. The Office is not a random series of cynical gags aimed at momentarily alleviating the existential despair of low-level grunts. It is a fully-realized theory of management that falsifies 83.8% of the business section of the bookstore. The theory begins with Hugh MacLeod’s well-known cartoon, Company Hierarchy (below), and its cornerstone is something I will call The Gervais Principle, which supersedes both the Peter Principle and its successor, The Dilbert Principle. Outside of the comic aisle, the only major and significant works consistent with the Gervais Principle are The Organization Man and Images of Organization. "
title(TheOffice)  business  organizations  management  career  sociopathy  success 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Study Hacks » Blog Archive » Impact Algorithms: Strategies Remarkable People Use to Accomplish Remarkable Things
"I’ve been writing recently about the impact instinct — the ability to consistently steer your work somewhere remarkable. We know that diligently focusing on a single general direction and then applying deliberate practice to systematically become more skilled, are both crucial for standing out. But true remarkability seems to also require this extra push."
gtd  success  impact  profession  graduate-school  advice 
june 2012 by tsuomela
Next Time, Fail Better - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Humanities students should be more like computer-science students.

I decided that as I sat in on a colleague's computer-science course during the beginning of this, my last, semester in the classroom. I am moving into administration full time, and I figured that this was my last chance to learn some of the cool new digital-humanities stuff I've been reading about. What eventually drove me out of the class (which I was enjoying tremendously) was the time commitment: The work of coding, I discovered, was an endless round of failure, failure, failure before eventual success. Computer-science students are used to failing. They do it all the time. It's built into the process, and they take it in stride."
learning  education  discipline  humanities  computer-science  failure  success 
may 2012 by tsuomela
What is Good Teaching? A Reflection | Common Dreams
"As a public school teacher, I've come to believe that good teaching comes down to six essential practices. I call them Inducement, Conveyance, Meta-Learning, Empowerment, Modeling, and Application. Just as when all eight amino acids must be present for a protein to form, all six of these activities must be present for Good Teaching (and Good Learning) to occur."
teaching  pedagogy  creativity  definition  success 
may 2012 by tsuomela
Study Hacks » Blog Archive » Do What Works, Not What’s Satisfying: Pseudo-Striving and our Fear of Reality-Based Planning
"The Pseudo-Striving Hypothesis
It’s significantly more pleasant to pursue a goal with a plan entirely of our own construction, then to use a plan based on a systematic study of what actually works. The former allows us to pseudo-strive, experiencing the fulfillment of busyness and complex planning while avoiding any of the uncomfortable, deliberate, often harsh difficulties that populate plans of the latter type."
gtd  work  success  planning  tips 
april 2012 by tsuomela
War and Presidential Greatness by David Henderson, Zachary Gochenour :: SSRN
"Historians and journalists commonly survey other historians on the relative 'greatness' of American presidents, and these rankings show remarkable consistency between surveys. In this paper we consider commonalities between highly ranked presidents and compare plausible determinants of greatness according to historians. We find that a strong predictor of greatness is the fraction of American lives lost in war during a president’s tenure. We find this predictor to be robust and compare favorably to other predictors used in previous historical research. We discuss potential reasons for this correlation and conclude with a discussion of how historians’ views might affect policy. "
political-science  war  military  perception  success  greatness 
april 2012 by tsuomela
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