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Thieves of Experience: How Google and Facebook Corrupted Capitalism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Surveillance Capitalism The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power By Shoshana Zuboff Published 01.15.2019 PublicAffairs 704 Pages"
book  review  internet  technology-effects  social-media  surveillance  business-model  capitalism 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Habeas Data » Melville House Books
"Habeas Data shows how the explosive growth of surveillance technology has outpaced our understanding of the ethics, mores, and laws of privacy. Award-winning tech reporter Cyrus Farivar makes the case by taking ten historic court decisions that defined our privacy rights and matching them against the capabilities of modern technology. It’s an approach that combines the charge of a legal thriller with the shock of the daily headlines. Chapters include: the 1960s prosecution of a bookie that established the “reasonable expectation of privacy” in nonpublic places beyond your home (but how does that ruling apply now, when police can chart your every move and hear your every conversation within your own home — without even having to enter it?); the 1970s case where the police monitored a lewd caller — the decision of which is now the linchpin of the NSA’s controversial metadata tracking program revealed by Edward Snowden; and a 2010 low-level burglary trial that revealed police had tracked a defendant’s past 12,898 locations before arrest — an invasion of privacy grossly out of proportion to the alleged crime, which showed how authorities are all too willing to take advantage of the ludicrous gap between the slow pace of legal reform and the rapid transformation of technology."
book  publisher  surveillance  big-data  computer  culture 
september 2018 by tsuomela
I’ll Be Watching You
Review of Dragonfly Eyes by Xu Bing. A film made up of surveillance footage.
review  surveillance  film  movie  cinema 
july 2018 by tsuomela
TECHNOLOGICAL THREATS TO CIVIL LIBERTIES
"Following are the final speaking notes for the informal Douglas Paper #8282, “Technological Threats to Civil Liberty”, presented at the IEEE's 15th Annual Asilomar Invitational Microcomputer Workshop, 26 - 28 April 1989 at Asilomar, CA. MDC builds weapons to defend the Free World and, by extension, its values and institutions. Examination of technological impacts on freedom is not, therefore, entirely inappropriate. The underlying thesis is that most channels of information flow have been exploited sooner or later for the purposes of control and maintenance of social order, benign or not. "
technology-effects  surveillance  history  1980s 
june 2018 by tsuomela
How Tech Companies Became a Political Force | The New Republic
"TROUBLEMAKERS: SILICON VALLEY’S COMING OF AGE by Leslie BerlinSimon & Schuster, 512 pp., $30 THE KNOW-IT-ALLS: THE RISE OF SILICON VALLEY AS A POLITICAL POWERHOUSE AND SOCIAL WRECKING BALL by Noam Cohen The New Press, 272 pp., $25.95"
books  review  technology  silicon-valley  culture  business  idealism  advertising  surveillance 
february 2018 by tsuomela
Responsible Data Forum — A series of collaborative events, convened to develop useful tools and strategies for dealing with the ethical, security and privacy challenges facing data-driven advocacy.
"The Responsible Data Forum is a collaborative effort to develop useful tools and strategies for dealing with the ethical, security and privacy challenges facing data-driven advocacy. RDF activities include organizing events; fostering discussion between communities; developing and testing concrete tools; disseminating useful information; and advocating for advocates and their supporters to improve the way they work with data. The Forum is a collaboration between Amnesty International, Aspiration, The Engine Room, Greenhost, HURIDOCS, Leiden University’s Peace Informatics Lab, Open Knowledge and Ushahidi."
big-data  privacy  surveillance  risk  humanitarian  genocide  human-rights  activism 
december 2016 by tsuomela
Online tracking: A 1-million-site measurement and analysis
"Online tracking: A 1-million-site measurement and analysis is the largest and most detailed measurement of online tracking to date. We measure stateful (cookie-based) and stateless (fingerprinting-based) tracking, the effect of browser privacy tools, and "cookie syncing". This measurement is made possible by our web measurement tool OpenWPM, a mature platform that enables fully automated web crawls using a full-fledged and instrumented browser."
research  online  internet  tracking  privacy  surveillance  browser 
may 2016 by tsuomela
Overseas Surveillance in an Interconnected World | Brennan Center for Justice
"Recent debates about privacy and technology have focused on the actions of government agencies inside the U.S. — for example, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's efforts to break encryption on iPhones or the National Security Agency's bulk collection of Americans' phone records. But in a new report, we found that the NSA's overseas surveillance activities through Executive Order 12333, most of which remain shrouded in secrecy, may have a far great impact on Americans' privacy."
privacy  surveillance  nsa  foreign-policy  intelligence 
march 2016 by tsuomela
Limitless Worker Surveillance by Ifeoma Ajunwa, Kate Crawford, Jason Schultz :: SSRN
"From the Pinkerton private detectives of the 1850s, to the closed-circuit cameras and email monitoring of the 1990s, to contemporary apps that quantify the productivity of workers, American employers have increasingly sought to track the activities of their employees. Along with economic and technological limits, the law has always been presumed as a constraint on these surveillance activities. Recently, technological advancements in several fields – data analytics, communications capture, mobile device design, DNA testing, and biometrics – have dramatically expanded capacities for worker surveillance both on and off the job. At the same time, the cost of many forms of surveillance has dropped significantly, while new technologies make the surveillance of workers even more convenient and accessible. This leaves the law as the last meaningful avenue to delineate boundaries for worker surveillance. In this Article, we examine the effectiveness of the law as a check on worker surveillance, given recent technological innovations. In particular, we focus on two popular trends in worker tracking – productivity apps and worker wellness programs – to argue that current legal constraints are insufficient and may leave American workers at the mercy of 24/7 employer monitoring. We then propose a new comprehensive framework for worker privacy protections that should withstand current and future trends."
law  surveillance  work  privacy 
march 2016 by tsuomela
The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality
"The Internet enables the free flow of information on an unprecedented scale but to an increasing extent the management of individuals’ fundamental rights, such as privacy and the mediation of free expression, is being left in the hands of private actors. The popularity of a few web platforms across the globe confers on the providers both great power and heavy responsibilities. Free-to-use web platforms are founded on the sale of user data, and the standard terms give providers rights to intrude on every aspect of a user’s online life, while giving users the Hobson’s choice of either agreeing to those terms or not using the platform (the illusion of consent). Meanwhile, the same companies are steadily assuming responsibility for monitoring and censoring harmful content, either as a self-regulatory response to prevent conflicts with national regulatory environments, or to address inaction by states, which bear primary duty for upholding human rights. There is an underlying tension for those companies between self-regulation, on the one hand, and being held accountable for rights violations by states, on the other hand. The incongruity of this position might explain the secrecy surrounding the human systems that companies have developed to monitor content (the illusion of automation). Psychological experiments and opaque algorithms for defining what search results or friends’ updates users see highlight the power of today’s providers over their publics (the illusion of neutrality). Solutions could include provision of paid alternatives, more sophisticated definition and handling of different types of data — public, private, ephemeral, lasting — and the cooperation of all stakeholders in arriving at realistic and robust processes for content moderation that comply with the rule of law."
privacy  consent  internet  business  surveillance  secrecy  social-media 
february 2016 by tsuomela
Why Do We Expose Ourselves?
" Exposed: Desire and Disobedience in the Digital Age, Bernard Harcourt"
book  review  surveillance  big-data  psychology  desire  motivation  exposure 
january 2016 by tsuomela
The Surveillance Paradigm: Be the friction - Our Response to the New Lords of the Ring - Feuilleton - FAZ
"A new social logic is taking shape: It’s all about surveillance. The individual is used as a mere provider of data. It’s time to break the arrogance of Silicon Valley."
silicon-valley  surveillance  data  big-data  business  privacy 
november 2015 by tsuomela
The Creepy New Wave of the Internet by Sue Halpern | The New York Review of Books
"The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism by Jeremy Rifkin Palgrave Macmillan, 356 pp., $28.00 Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things by David Rose Scribner, 304 pp., $28.00 Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacy by Robert Scoble and Shel Israel, with a foreword by Marc Benioff Patrick Brewster, 225 pp., $14.45 (paper) More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys and Their Heroic Quest to Save Your Privacy from Facebook by Jim Dwyer Viking, 374 pp., $27.95"
books  review  internet-of-things  surveillance  privacy  futurism  futures  internet  technology  technology-effects 
november 2014 by tsuomela
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