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Winning Slowly
"There are plenty of podcasts that will tell you how the latest tech gadget or “innovation” will affect the tech landscape tomorrow, but there aren’t that many concerned with the potential impact of that tech in a decade. In a culture obsessed with now, how can we make choices with a view for tomorrow, next year, and beyond? "
podcast  environment  technology-critique 
november 2019 by tsuomela
Daring to Hope for the Improbable: On Bernard Stiegler’s “The Age of Disruption” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Disruption Technology and Madness in Computational Capitalism By Bernard Stiegler Published 08.27.2019 Polity 380 Pages"
book  review  technology-critique  technology-effects  capitalism  madness 
november 2019 by tsuomela
Netflix and Nil - The New Atlantis
"Nihilism and Technology By Nolen Gertz Rowman & Littlefield Int. 2018 ~ 227 pp. $85 (cloth) $34.95 (paper)"
book  review  technology-critique  philosophy  about(FredrichNietzsche)  nihilism 
april 2019 by tsuomela
Bigger Than the USSR: A Conversation with Nick Srnicek, Author of “Platform Capitalism” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"IN THE FOLLOWING conversation, I ask Nick Srnicek, the author of Platform Capitalism, about the nature — and dangers — of digital technology platform companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Walmart."
interview  platform  capitalism  technology-critique 
march 2019 by tsuomela
The Fight for Our Eyeballs - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Stand Out of Our Light Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy By James Williams Published 05.31.2018 Cambridge University Press 144 Pages"
book  review  technology-critique  social-media  attention  business  advertising 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Humanity’s Halting Problem, Adam Riggio « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective
"Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger have written Re-Engineering Humanity as a sustained and multifaceted critique of how contemporary trends in internet technology are slowly but surely shrinking the territory of human autonomy. Their work is a warning, as well as a description, of how internet technologies that ostensibly make our lives easier do so by taking control of our lives away from our self-conscious decision-making."
book  review  technology  technology-critique  big-data 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Down and Out in Silicon Valley - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Live Work Work Work Die A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley By Corey Pein Published 04.24.2018 Metropolitan Books 320 Pages"
book  review  silicon-valley  technology-critique  work  labor 
june 2018 by tsuomela
Radical Technologies | IndieBound
"Everywhere we turn, a startling new device promises to transfigure our lives. But at what cost? In this urgent and revelatory excavation of our Information Age, leading technology thinker Adam Greenfield forces us to reconsider our relationship with the networked objects, services and spaces that define us. It is time to re-evaluate the Silicon Valley consensus determining the future. We already depend on the smartphone to navigate every aspect of our existence. We're told that innovations--from augmented-reality interfaces and virtual assistants to autonomous delivery drones and self-driving cars--will make life easier, more convenient and more productive. 3D printing promises unprecedented control over the form and distribution of matter, while the blockchain stands to revolutionize everything from the recording and exchange of value to the way we organize the mundane realities of the day to day. And, all the while, fiendishly complex algorithms are operating quietly in the background, reshaping the economy, transforming the fundamental terms of our politics and even redefining what it means to be human. Having successfully colonized everyday life, these radical technologies are now conditioning the choices available to us in the years to come. How do they work? What challenges do they present to us, as individuals and societies? Who benefits from their adoption? In answering these questions, Greenfield's timely guide clarifies the scale and nature of the crisis we now confront --and offers ways to reclaim our stake in the future."
book  technology-critique 
may 2017 by tsuomela
Hindman, M.: The Myth of Digital Democracy (eBook and Paperback).
"Is the Internet democratizing American politics? Do political Web sites and blogs mobilize inactive citizens and make the public sphere more inclusive? The Myth of Digital Democracy reveals that, contrary to popular belief, the Internet has done little to broaden political discourse but in fact empowers a small set of elites--some new, but most familiar. Matthew Hindman argues that, though hundreds of thousands of Americans blog about politics, blogs receive only a miniscule portion of Web traffic, and most blog readership goes to a handful of mainstream, highly educated professionals. He shows how, despite the wealth of independent Web sites, online news audiences are concentrated on the top twenty outlets, and online organizing and fund-raising are dominated by a few powerful interest groups. Hindman tracks nearly three million Web pages, analyzing how their links are structured, how citizens search for political content, and how leading search engines like Google and Yahoo! funnel traffic to popular outlets. He finds that while the Internet has increased some forms of political participation and transformed the way interest groups and candidates organize, mobilize, and raise funds, elites still strongly shape how political material on the Web is presented and accessed. The Myth of Digital Democracy. debunks popular notions about political discourse in the digital age, revealing how the Internet has neither diminished the audience share of corporate media nor given greater voice to ordinary citizens."
book  publisher  internet  democracy  political-science  technology-critique 
march 2017 by tsuomela
Data Love | Books | Columbia University Press
"Intelligence services, government administrations, businesses, and a growing majority of the population are hooked on the idea that big data can reveal patterns and correlations in everyday life. Initiated by software engineers and carried out through algorithms, the mining of big data has sparked a silent revolution. But algorithmic analysis and data mining are not simply byproducts of media development or the logical consequences of computation. They are the radicalization of the Enlightenment's quest for knowledge and progress. Data Love argues that the "cold civil war" of big data is taking place not among citizens or between the citizen and government but within each of us. Roberto Simanowski elaborates on the changes data love has brought to the human condition while exploring the entanglements of those who—out of stinginess, convenience, ignorance, narcissism, or passion—contribute to the amassing of ever more data about their lives, leading to the statistical evaluation and individual profiling of their selves. Writing from a philosophical standpoint, Simanowski illustrates the social implications of technological development and retrieves the concepts, events, and cultural artifacts of past centuries to help decode the programming of our present."
book  publisher  data  big-data  technology-critique 
october 2016 by tsuomela
The Technoskeptic | Home
"The Technoskeptic is an online magazine exploring the intersection of technology and society from a humanistic perspective. Our aim is to create awareness, act as a resource, build community, and change culture."
magazine  technology  technology-critique  humanism 
january 2016 by tsuomela
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