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Frey, C.: The Technology Trap: Capital, Labor, and Power in the Age of Automation (Hardcover, Ebook, Audiobook-mp3 and Audiobook-wav) | Princeton University Press
"How the history of technological revolutions can help us better understand economic and political polarization in the age of automation From the Industrial Revolution to the age of artificial intelligence, The Technology Trap takes a sweeping look at the history of technological progress and how it has radically shifted the distribution of economic and political power among society’s members. As Carl Benedikt Frey shows, the Industrial Revolution created unprecedented wealth and prosperity over the long run, but the immediate consequences of mechanization were devastating for large swaths of the population. Middle-income jobs withered, wages stagnated, the labor share of income fell, profits surged, and economic inequality skyrocketed. These trends, Frey documents, broadly mirror those in our current age of automation, which began with the Computer Revolution. Just as the Industrial Revolution eventually brought about extraordinary benefits for society, artificial intelligence systems have the potential to do the same. But Frey argues that this depends on how the short term is managed. In the nineteenth century, workers violently expressed their concerns over machines taking their jobs. The Luddite uprisings joined a long wave of machinery riots that swept across Europe and China. Today’s despairing middle class has not resorted to physical force, but their frustration has led to rising populism and the increasing fragmentation of society. As middle-class jobs continue to come under pressure, there’s no assurance that positive attitudes to technology will persist. The Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. The Technology Trap demonstrates that in the midst of another technological revolution, the lessons of the past can help us to more effectively face the present."
book  publisher  economics  technology  technology-effects 
26 days ago by tsuomela
Thieves of Experience: How Google and Facebook Corrupted Capitalism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Surveillance Capitalism The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power By Shoshana Zuboff Published 01.15.2019 PublicAffairs 704 Pages"
book  review  internet  technology-effects  social-media  surveillance  business-model  capitalism 
january 2019 by tsuomela
Media democratization and the rise of Trump | ROUGH TYPE
"The following review of the book Trump and the Media appeared originally, in a slightly different form, in the Los Angeles Review of Books."
book  review  technology-effects  media-studies  journalism 
august 2018 by tsuomela
The American Scholar: Too Much Information - Howard P. Segal
"The Efficiency Paradox: What Big Data Can’t Do by Edward Tenner; Knopf, 282 pp., $27.95"
book  review  efficiency  technology-effects 
august 2018 by tsuomela
TECHNOLOGICAL THREATS TO CIVIL LIBERTIES
"Following are the final speaking notes for the informal Douglas Paper #8282, “Technological Threats to Civil Liberty”, presented at the IEEE's 15th Annual Asilomar Invitational Microcomputer Workshop, 26 - 28 April 1989 at Asilomar, CA. MDC builds weapons to defend the Free World and, by extension, its values and institutions. Examination of technological impacts on freedom is not, therefore, entirely inappropriate. The underlying thesis is that most channels of information flow have been exploited sooner or later for the purposes of control and maintenance of social order, benign or not. "
technology-effects  surveillance  history  1980s 
june 2018 by tsuomela
The New Analog | The New Press
"What John Berger did to ways of seeing, well-known indy musician Damon Krukowski does to ways of listening in this lively guide to the transition from analog to digital culture Having made his name in the late 1980s as a member of the indie band Galaxie 500, Damon Krukowski has watched cultural life lurch from analog to digital. And as an artist who has weathered the transition, he has challenging, urgent questions for both creators and consumers about what we have thrown away in the process: Are our devices leaving us lost in our own headspace even as they pinpoint our location? Does the long reach of digital communication come at the sacrifice of our ability to gauge social distance? Do streaming media discourage us from listening closely? Are we hearing each other fully in this new environment? Rather than simply rejecting the digital disruption of cultural life, Krukowski uses the sound engineer’s distinction of signal and noise to reexamine what we have lost as a technological culture, looking carefully at what was valuable in the analog realm so we can hold on to it. Taking a set of experiences from the production and consumption of music that have changed since the analog era—the disorientation of headphones, flattening of the voice, silence of media, loudness of mastering, and manipulation of time—as a basis for a broader exploration of contemporary culture, Krukowski gives us a brilliant meditation and guide to keeping our heads amid the digital flux. Think of it as plugging in without tuning out."
book  publisher  digital  analog  signals  noise  technology-effects 
november 2017 by tsuomela
Blockchains Never Forget
A very interesting piece by Venkatesh Rao that provides the best reason I've seen so far for widespread adoption of blockchain technologies.
blockchain  history  technology-effects  forgetting  forgiveness  memory  institutions  organizations 
may 2017 by tsuomela
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