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tsuomela : technology   1059

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Frey, C.: The Technology Trap: Capital, Labor, and Power in the Age of Automation (Hardcover, Ebook, Audiobook-mp3 and Audiobook-wav) | Princeton University Press
"How the history of technological revolutions can help us better understand economic and political polarization in the age of automation From the Industrial Revolution to the age of artificial intelligence, The Technology Trap takes a sweeping look at the history of technological progress and how it has radically shifted the distribution of economic and political power among society’s members. As Carl Benedikt Frey shows, the Industrial Revolution created unprecedented wealth and prosperity over the long run, but the immediate consequences of mechanization were devastating for large swaths of the population. Middle-income jobs withered, wages stagnated, the labor share of income fell, profits surged, and economic inequality skyrocketed. These trends, Frey documents, broadly mirror those in our current age of automation, which began with the Computer Revolution. Just as the Industrial Revolution eventually brought about extraordinary benefits for society, artificial intelligence systems have the potential to do the same. But Frey argues that this depends on how the short term is managed. In the nineteenth century, workers violently expressed their concerns over machines taking their jobs. The Luddite uprisings joined a long wave of machinery riots that swept across Europe and China. Today’s despairing middle class has not resorted to physical force, but their frustration has led to rising populism and the increasing fragmentation of society. As middle-class jobs continue to come under pressure, there’s no assurance that positive attitudes to technology will persist. The Industrial Revolution was a defining moment in history, but few grasped its enormous consequences at the time. The Technology Trap demonstrates that in the midst of another technological revolution, the lessons of the past can help us to more effectively face the present."
book  publisher  economics  technology  technology-effects 
24 days ago by tsuomela
The Power and the Noise | Will Meyer
"Ways of Hearing by Damon Krukowski. MIT Press, 136 pages."
books  review  audio  technology 
6 weeks ago by tsuomela
Why life hacking has fallen out of favor.
"Hacking Life: Systematized Living and Its Discontents By Joseph M. Reagle Jr. The MIT Press. "
book  review  lifehacks  technology  silicon-valley  ideology  privilege  2000s 
7 weeks ago by tsuomela
Feasting on Precarity - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Uberland How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work By Alex Rosenblat Published 10.23.2018 University of California Press 296 Pages"
book  review  work  labor  technology  arbitrage  regulation  rhetoric  law 
january 2019 by tsuomela
Common-Knowledge Attacks on Democracy by Henry Farrell, Bruce Schneier :: SSRN
"Existing approaches to cybersecurity emphasize either international state-to-state logics (such as deterrence theory) or the integrity of individual information systems. Neither provides a good understanding of new “soft cyber” attacks that involve the manipulation of expectations and common understandings. We argue that scaling up computer security arguments to the level of the state, so that the entire polity is treated as an information system with associated attack surfaces and threat models, provides the best immediate way to understand these attacks and how to mitigate them. We demonstrate systematic differences between how autocracies and democracies work as information systems, because they rely on different mixes of common and contested political knowledge. Stable autocracies will have common knowledge over who is in charge and their associated ideological or policy goals, but will generate contested knowledge over who the various political actors in society are, and how they might form coalitions and gain public support, so as to make it more difficult for coalitions to displace the regime. Stable democracies will have contested knowledge over who is in charge, but common knowledge over who the political actors are, and how they may form coalitions and gain public support. These differences are associated with notably different attack surfaces and threat models. Specifically, democracies are vulnerable to measures that “flood” public debate and disrupt shared decentralized understandings of actors and coalitions, in ways that autocracies are not. "
democracy  political-science  technology  information-science  security 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Emerging Threats | Knight First Amendment Institute
"The Knight First Amendment Institute’s Emerging Threats series invites leading thinkers to identify and grapple with newly arising or intensifying structural threats to the system of free expression. Fake news, hostile audiences, powerful private platforms, government secret-keeping, and other phenomena have the potential to destabilize political systems and undermine economic and social reform. The papers in the series explore ways to address these threats and preserve the foundations of democracy essential to healthy open societies, including the United States. "
first-amendment  freedom  american  technology 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Humanity’s Halting Problem, Adam Riggio « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective
"Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger have written Re-Engineering Humanity as a sustained and multifaceted critique of how contemporary trends in internet technology are slowly but surely shrinking the territory of human autonomy. Their work is a warning, as well as a description, of how internet technologies that ostensibly make our lives easier do so by taking control of our lives away from our self-conscious decision-making."
book  review  technology  technology-critique  big-data 
september 2018 by tsuomela
American Scientist
"MARKETING THE MOON: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program. David Meerman Scott and Richard Jurek. xiv + 130 pp. MIT Press, 2014. $39.95."
book  review  space  history  technology  marketing  nasa 
july 2018 by tsuomela
How Tech Companies Became a Political Force | The New Republic
"TROUBLEMAKERS: SILICON VALLEY’S COMING OF AGE by Leslie BerlinSimon & Schuster, 512 pp., $30 THE KNOW-IT-ALLS: THE RISE OF SILICON VALLEY AS A POLITICAL POWERHOUSE AND SOCIAL WRECKING BALL by Noam Cohen The New Press, 272 pp., $25.95"
books  review  technology  silicon-valley  culture  business  idealism  advertising  surveillance 
february 2018 by tsuomela
Logic Magazine
"We are a print magazine about technology that publishes three times per year, with a small digital footprint."
magazine  technology 
december 2017 by tsuomela
Profile : All People: School of Informatics and Computing: Indiana University
"Nathan Ensmenger is an associate professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University. His research focuses on the social and cultural history of software and software workers, the history of artificial intelligence, and questions of gender and identity in computer programming. His 2010 book The Computer Boys Take Over: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise, explored to the rise to power of the "computer expert" in American corporate, economic, and political life. He is one of the co-authors of the most recent edition of the popular Computer: A history of the Information Machine. He is currently working on a book exploring the global environmental history of the electronic digital computer."
people  academic  sts  technology  history 
december 2017 by tsuomela
From Good Intentions to Real Outcomes - Connected Learning Alliance
"The growth of online communication, media, and gaming is driving dramatic changes in how we learn. Responding to these shifts, new forms of technology-enhanced learning and instruction, such as personalized learning, open online courses, educational games and apps, and tools for learning analytics, are garnering significant public attention and private investment. These technologies hold tremendous promise for improving learning experiences and outcomes. Despite this promise, however, evidence is mounting that these new technologies tend to be used and accessed in unequal ways, and they may even exacerbate inequity. In February and May 2017, leading researchers, educators, and technologists convened for in-depth working sessions to share challenges and solutions for how learning technologies can provide the greatest benefits for our most vulnerable learners.The aim was to develop guiding principles and a shared agenda for how educational platforms and funders can best serve diverse and disadvantaged learners. These principles include inclusive design processes, ways of addressing barriers, and meth- ods to effectively measure impact. This report synthesizes the research, learnings, and recommendations that participants offered at the two workshops. After framing the nature of the challenge, the report then describes promising strategies and examples, and it ends with recommendations for next steps in research and coalition building."
digital-pedagogy  teaching  technology  diversity  access  equity 
november 2017 by tsuomela
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