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Trends in College Pricing - Trends in Higher Education - The College Board
"Trends in College Pricing provides information on changes over time in undergraduate tuition and fees, room and board, and other estimated expenses related to attending colleges and universities. The report, which includes data through 2018-19 from the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges, reveals the wide variation in prices charged by institutions of different types and in different parts of the country. Of particular importance is the focus on the net prices students actually pay after taking grant aid into consideration. Data on institutional revenues and expenditures and on changing enrollment patterns over time supplement the data on prices to provide a clearer picture of the circumstances of students and the institutions in which they study."
college  university  cost  pricing  academic  economics  financial-aid 
august 2019 by tsuomela
Why They Can't Write | Johns Hopkins University Press Books
"There seems to be widespread agreement that—when it comes to the writing skills of college students—we are in the midst of a crisis. In Why They Can't Write, John Warner, who taught writing at the college level for two decades, argues that the problem isn't caused by a lack of rigor, or smartphones, or some generational character defect. Instead, he asserts, we're teaching writing wrong. Warner blames this on decades of educational reform rooted in standardization, assessments, and accountability. We have done no more, Warner argues, than conditioned students to perform "writing-related simulations," which pass temporary muster but do little to help students develop their writing abilities. This style of teaching has made students passive and disengaged. Worse yet, it hasn't prepared them for writing in the college classroom. Rather than making choices and thinking critically, as writers must, undergraduates simply follow the rules—such as the five-paragraph essay—designed to help them pass these high-stakes assessments. In Why They Can't Write, Warner has crafted both a diagnosis for what ails us and a blueprint for fixing a broken system. Combining current knowledge of what works in teaching and learning with the most enduring philosophies of classical education, this book challenges readers to develop the skills, attitudes, knowledge, and habits of mind of strong writers."
book  publisher  academia  education  university  writing 
may 2019 by tsuomela
The Great Mistake | Johns Hopkins University Press Books
"Higher education in America, still thought to be the world leader, is in crisis. University students are falling behind their international peers in attainment, while suffering from unprecedented student debt. For over a decade, the realm of American higher education has been wracked with self-doubt and mutual recrimination, with no clear solutions on the horizon. How did this happen? In this stunning new book, Christopher Newfield offers readers an in-depth analysis of the "great mistake" that led to the cycle of decline and dissolution, a mistake that impacts every public college and university in America. What might occur, he asserts, is no less than locked-in economic inequality and the fall of the middle class. In The Great Mistake, Newfield asks how we can fix higher education, given the damage done by private-sector models. The current accepted wisdom—that to succeed, universities should be more like businesses—is dead wrong. Newfield combines firsthand experience with expert analysis to show that private funding and private-sector methods cannot replace public funding or improve efficiency, arguing that business-minded practices have increased costs and gravely damaged the university’s value to society. It is imperative that universities move beyond the destructive policies that have led them to destabilize their finances, raise tuition, overbuild facilities, create a national student debt crisis, and lower educational quality. Laying out an interconnected cycle of mistakes, from subsidizing the private sector to "the poor get poorer" funding policies, Newfield clearly demonstrates how decisions made in government, in the corporate world, and at colleges themselves contribute to the dismantling of once-great public higher education. A powerful, hopeful critique of the unnecessary death spiral of higher education, The Great Mistake is essential reading for those who wonder why students have been paying more to get less and for everyone who cares about the role the higher education system plays in improving the lives of average Americans."
book  publisher  academia  education  university 
may 2019 by tsuomela
Understanding Society: The research university
"Jason Owen-Smith's recent Research Universities and the Public Good: Discovery for an Uncertain Future "
book  review  university  research  innovation 
january 2019 by tsuomela
Home | Greenhouse Studios
"Greenhouse Studios | Scholarly Communications Design at the University of Connecticut solves the problems and explores the opportunities of scholarship in the “digital age.” A transdisciplinary collective, Greenhouse Studios reframes the practices, pathways and products of scholarly communications through design-based, inquiry-driven, collaboration-first approaches to the creation and expression of knowledge."
scholarly-communication  university 
september 2017 by tsuomela
Two books explore how philosophical change led to skyrocketing college tuition - Chicago Tribune
"Two new books help answer these questions: "Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream" by Sara Goldrick-Rab, and "The Great Mistake: How We Wrecked Public Universities and How We Can Fix Them" by Christopher Newfield."
book  review  academia  cost  college  university  economics 
november 2016 by tsuomela
Higher Ed Insights: Results of the Spring 2016 Survey | Ithaka S+R
"In fall 2015, Ithaka S+R invited a select group of higher education administrators and experts to join a panel of advisors. One activity of the panel, which currently consists of 111 members with diverse backgrounds and perspectives, is to take part in semi-annual surveys on issues of national importance in higher education. The first of these surveys was administered in the fall of 2015.[1] Ithaka S+R analyzes and publishes the results of these surveys to inform the broader higher education community about the panel’s views on current debates, initiatives, and challenges. The results of the Higher Ed Insights surveys also help guide Ithaka S+R’s research agenda."
academia  academic  research  university  education  pedagogy  survey  america  administration  future  goals 
september 2016 by tsuomela
Sustainability Implementation Toolkit | Ithaka S+R
"What do the digital humanities look like on your campus? What types of projects are your faculty undertaking? Which will require longer-term support, and where will that support come from? What roles do your service units, centers, and digital labs play in the various life-cycle stages, and is this clear to faculty? This toolkit will help administrators create a coherent institutional strategy for supporting digital humanities activities and the valuable outputs that they generate."
digital-humanities  report  sustainability  academic  university  implementation 
june 2015 by tsuomela
The Liberal Arts vs. Neoliberalism | Commonweal Magazine
"Jackson Lears on Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life by William Deresiewicz"
book  review  academia  humanities  culture  education  teaching  pedagogy  learning  philosophy  neoliberalism  college  university 
april 2015 by tsuomela
Home - Worldwide Universities Network
"The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is a leading global higher education and research network made up of 16 universities, spanning 10 countries on five continents. Together we work to drive international research collaboration and address issues of global significance."
academic  collaboration  university  consortium 
january 2015 by tsuomela
The Digital Panopticon | The Global Impact of London Punishments, 1780-1925
"The Digital Panopticon is a collaboration between the Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield, Tasmania, Oxford and Sussex, with funding from the AHRC. Led by an international team of established researchers, it will use digital technologies to bring together existing and new genealogical, biometric and criminal justice datasets held by different organisations in the UK and Australia. It will explore the impact of the different types of penal punishments on the lives of 66,000 people sentenced at The Old Bailey between 1780 and 1875, develop new and transferable methodologies for understanding and exploiting complex bodies of genealogical, biometric, and criminal justice data and create a searchable website."
digital-humanities  project  academic  university  punishment  crime  history 
july 2014 by tsuomela
Statement on the President’s Proposal for Performance Based Funding | AAUP
from the president of the American Association of University Professors. In response to Obama proposal to base funding on performance.
education  academic  future  finance  funding  college  university  government  regulation 
september 2013 by tsuomela
SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) | Association of Research Libraries® | ARL®
"Research universities are long-lived and mission-driven institutions that generate, make accessible, and preserve over time new knowledge and understanding. ARL, the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have drafted a proposal, “SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)” (PDF), as a long-term solution for higher education to manage its digital assets. The proposal also serves as a response to the recent White House directive on public access to federally funded research and data. The three associations envision SHARE as a network of digital repositories at universities, libraries, and other research institutions across the US that will provide long-term public access to federally funded research articles and data."
data-curation  academic  university  research  government  professional-association 
august 2013 by tsuomela
Factories of Knowledge, Industries of Creativity | The MIT Press
"What was once the factory is now the university. As deindustrialization spreads and the working class is decentralized, new means of social resistance and political activism need to be sought in what may be the last places where they are possible: the university and the art world. Gerald Raunig’s new book analyzes the potential that cognitive and creative labor has in these two arenas to resist the new regimes of domination imposed by cognitive capitalism. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze’s concept of “modulation” as the market-driven imperative for the constant transformation and reinvention of subjectivity, in Factories of Knowledge, Industries of Creativity, Raunig charts alternative horizons for resistance. Looking at recent social struggles including the university strikes in Europe, the Spanish ¡Democracia real YA! organization, the Arab revolts, and the Occupy movement, Raunig argues for a reassessment of the importance of cultural and knowledge production. The central role of the university, he asserts, is not as a factory of knowledge but as a place of creative disobedience."
book  publisher  university  academia  business 
july 2013 by tsuomela
UnderstandingSociety: Veblen on universities
"In 1918 Thorstein Veblen wrote a surprising short book about the administration and governance of American universities, The Higher Learning In America.  What is most surprising about the book is its date of publication. The critique he offers might have seemed familiar in 1968, whereas it seems precocious in 1918."
education  college  university  academia  critique  1910s  history 
january 2013 by tsuomela
All About the Money - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education
""The Earning Power of Graduates From Tennessee's Colleges and Universities" is the latest effort to precisely quantify the value of a degree. It identifies the payoff that individual programs at specific colleges yield the first year after graduation. While limited to Tennessee, it will be followed by similar analyses in other states, and it marks the arrival of a new way of evaluating higher education that brings conversations about college productivity and performance to the program level."
education  economics  success  college  university  degree  academia  values  state(Tennessee) 
october 2012 by tsuomela
The Narrowing of the American Mind - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Wage studies that look only at the graduate's choice of major may well accelerate the narrowing of the American mind at the very moment in history when multidimensional learning—liberal learning—has become essential to success."
education  economics  success  college  university  degree  academia  values 
october 2012 by tsuomela
Dissent Magazine - Online Features - Universities and the Urban Growth Machine -
"With mortgage and other credit markets still in the doldrums, universities have become a very attractive option for investors looking for high returns on debt-financed growth. Money capital has poured into construction bonds, student loans, and other financial instruments spun out of the tuition bubble. When universities become the apple of the financier’s eye, they begin to generate debt in every direction, as I have shown here. NYU’s own long-term debt is a hefty $2.6 billion, far outpacing that of other comparable urban universities: Columbia ($1.3 billion), USC ($0.973 billion), and Penn ($1.7 billion)."
university  college  debt  money  economics  growth  finance  academia  corporate 
october 2012 by tsuomela
Why Are College Textbooks So Expensive? « The Scholarly Kitchen
"Before I continue, I want to share an anecdote. One of my first publishing jobs was as the college paperback editor for New American Library, which is now part of Penguin. NAL had a long list of Signet Classics, which included classroom versions of public domain classics — Dickens, Thackeray, Austen, et al. These books were solidly profitable, but we noticed that the sales of our Signet Shakespeare series had begun to flatten out in the face of new competition. So we made the decision to revise the books: new introductions and bibliographies, new covers, and in some instances changes to the texts in light of modern scholarship. And that’s when I learned how college publishing worked. The head of our college marketing group came to me to say she loved the idea behind the new editions, but we had to be careful not to change the page numbers. How’s that again? It seems that many instructors used the same lecture notes year after year, sometimes for decades, and if you changed the page numbers, the notes would have to be revised. This could prompt some professors to switch to competitors’ editions."
academic  publishing  textbook  pricing  economics  professor  teaching  education  college  university 
october 2012 by tsuomela
Joe Paterno's legacy at Penn State in the aftermath of the Freeh Report - Grantland
This was my fundamental mistake. This was our mistake, as a community. The Grand Experiment began as a sales pitch, as a way for Paterno to elevate the standards of the university he loved by using football as the lure. And then at some point, the lure outweighed the catch, and the sales pitch drove motivations, and we were too myopic to see it. At some point, the little white lies that Paterno hid behind — that he would retire after five more years, that Bowling Green was, in fact, a formidable opponent, that the culture of football was in no way segregated from the culture of the university at large — ballooned into this, into a lie so unthinkable that it takes your breath away.
academia  sports  scandal  football  university 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Business - Jordan Weissmann - Why the Internet Isn't Going to End College As We Know It - The Atlantic
"What's more likely to happen is that colleges will learn how to adapt online technology to cut costs as they come under increasing budget pressure. They'll do it slowly, but eventually. The process might lead to fewer lecturers on campus, as schools begin sharing more big survey courses. The Harvards of the world might experiment with more remote, international campuses catering to foreign students. But a wholesale, top to bottom revolution in how we educate students? Not likely, no matter how many times you hear it repeated. "
education  college  university  academic  future  internet  reform  chance  online 
july 2012 by tsuomela
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