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tsuomela : wicked-problems   12

The cuckoo clock syndrome : addicted to command, allergic to leadership - WRAP: Warwick Research Archive Portal
This article considers the extent to which we are addicted to particular ways of configuring the world and responding in a culturally appropriate way. It suggests that the original Tame and Wicked problems typology of Rittell and Webber (1973) can be usefully expanded to provide a heuristic for explaining this addiction and then focuses upon the most common approach an addiction to Crisis and Command. Some likely explanations for this addiction are discussed and some illustrative examples provided. It concludes that not only does our predilection for Crisis and Command undermine our attempts to address Wicked problems adequately, but also that 'Leadership' (defined as persuading the collective to take responsibility for collective problems) is often regarded not just as difficult and dangerous, but as the enemy of the people'. We are, then, not only likely to be addicted to Command but also likely to be allergic to leadership.
problems  problem-solving  wicked-problems  understanding  solutions  culture  hierarchy  future  leadership 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Global Futures Studies
"The Millennium Project was founded in 1996 after a three-year feasibility study with the United Nations University, Smithsonian Institution, Futures Group International, and the American Council for the UNU. It is now an independent non-profit global participatory futures research think tank of futurists, scholars, business planners, and policy makers who work for international organizations, governments, corporations, NGOs, and universities. The Millennium Project manages a coherent and cumulative process that collects and assesses judgments from over 2,500 people since the beginning of the project selected by its 40 Nodes around the world. The work is distilled in its annual "State of the Future", "Futures Research Methodology" series, and special studies."
future  futures  research  scenario  planning  wicked-problems  problem-solving  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Our Eucatastrophe - Charlie's Diary
"Remember when I said in our last post that our problems are no longer technological? What I meant was that developing the technologies we need to save our collective asses is no longer the big issue
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science  social-media 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Wicked (2) - Charlie's Diary
"Why is it even possible to have misunderstandings online when we have all these tools at hand to help prevent them? It's because social media systems like Facebook are just the tricycle version of what social media will become. Facebook barely hints at what's coming
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence  social-science  social-media 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Wicked (1) - Charlie's Diary
"Here's my take on things: our biggest challenges are no longer technological. They are issues of communication, coordination, and cooperation. These are, for the most part, well-studied problems that are not wicked. The methodologies that solve them need to be scaled up from the small-group settings where they currently work well, and injected into the DNA of our society--or, at least, built into our default modes of using the internet. They then can be used to tackle the wicked problems."
communication  future  wicked-problems  problem-solving  scalability  learning  discussion  collaboration  collective-intelligence 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Open the Future: Long-Run vs. Long-Lag
Here's a simple example of a long-run problem: You're driving a car in a straight line, and the map indicates a cliff in the distance. You can change direction now, or you can change direction as the cliff looms, and either way you avoid the cliff. If you know that there's a turn-off ahead, you may keep driving towards the cliff until you get to your preferred exit.

The practice of waiting until the long-term becomes the near-term is less effective, however, for the other kind of distant problem: Let's call them "long-lag problems." With long-lag problems, there's a significant distance between cause and effect, for both the problem and any attempted solution. The available time to head-off the problem doesn't stretch from now until when the problem manifests
problem-solving  wicked-problems  future  long-term  long-lag  psychology 
october 2008 by tsuomela

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