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All 4 living former first ladies condemn Trump border policy that separates families | The New York Times
In the weeks since the Trump administration instituted a zero tolerance policy that seeks to criminally prosecute anyone who crosses the border unlawfully and effectively causes children to be separated from their families, criticism has poured in from advocacy groups, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle and a host of political luminaries who are no longer in office. Mary Fan, a UW law professor, is quoted.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  New.York.Times  Fan.Mary 
3 days ago by uwnews
2 options drafted for Everett City Council districting vote | The Everett Herald
The Everett City Council has finished a draft of its districting ordinance. Hugh Spitzer, a University of Washington law professor, is mentioned.
Spitzer.Hugh  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Everett.Herald 
4 days ago by uwnews
How mapping marijuana DNA could change the future of pot | Rolling Stone
Scientists hope that a "cannabis genome" could mean better results for growers and patients — but will it allow big pharma to take over? Sean O'Connor, a law professor at the UW, is quoted.
O'Connor.Sean  !UWitM  2018  natl  Rolling.Stone  School:Law  marijuana 
9 days ago by uwnews
Can the president pardon himself? | KUOW
Lisa Manheim, professor of law at the UW, is interviewed on KUOW's "The Record" about whether President Trump can pardon himself.
KUOW  !UWitM  2018  regl  politics  School:Law  Manheim.Lisa  radio 
10 days ago by uwnews
Supreme Court tie favors Indian tribes in Washington | The New York Times
Washington state must restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration after the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place a lower court order. Robert Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted. [This AP story appeared in several outlets]
New.York.Times  !UWitM  2018  natl  AP  Anderson.Robert  School:Law  Native.American.Law.Center 
10 days ago by uwnews
Victory for tribal treaty rights and salmon as US Supreme Court upholds culvert case ruling | KNKX
Tribes and conservationists are celebrating a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that upholds tribal treaty fishing rights. Robert Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted.
Anderson.Robert  !UWitM  2018  KNKX  regl  Native.American.Law.Center  School:Law 
10 days ago by uwnews
Will the state learn from another loss on tribal fishing rights? | Crosscut
On Monday; the United States Supreme Court affirmed lower court rulings that Washington had to accelerate its replacement of “barrier culverts” that were harming salmon runs and therefore violating tribal treaty fishing rights. Robert Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted.
Anderson.Robert  Native.American.Law.Center  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Crosscut 
10 days ago by uwnews
Supreme Court gives tribes a victory over Washington state in salmon case | KUOW
A tie in the U.S. Supreme Court may cost Washington state $2 billion. The court split 4-4 Monday in a long-running court battle between tribes and the state over salmon-blocking road culverts. Robert Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted.
KUOW  !UWitM  2018  regl  Anderson.Robert  Native.American.Law.Center  School:Law 
10 days ago by uwnews
Google bars uses of its artificial intelligence tech in weapons | The New York Times
Google will not allow its artificial intelligence software to be used in weapons or unreasonable surveillance efforts under new standards for its business decisions in the nascent field, the Alphabet Inc unit said on Thursday. A tweet by Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted. [This Reuters story appeared in several outlets]
Reuters  New.York.Times  !UWitM  2018  natl  Calo.Ryan  School:Law 
14 days ago by uwnews
'Jena 6' figure addresses fellow law school grads | The New York Times
A man who faced an attempted murder charge as a teenager in a case that sparked the "Jena 6" civil rights protest in central Louisiana in 2006 has graduated from the University of Washington law school. [This AP story appeared in several outlets]
New.York.Times  !UWitM  2018  natl  AP  students  School:Law 
16 days ago by uwnews
'Jena 6' defendant Theo Shaw delivers law school commencement address | NOLA
If we've learned nothing else in this current age, it's that a man who appears to be one thing in public can be something else in private. Theodore Roosevelt Shaw, then 17, was one of six black teenagers from Jena High School accused of attempted murder in an attack on a white student at the school. He gave an address to his graduating class at the UW's School of Law commencement Sunday.
students  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  NOLA  Commencement 
16 days ago by uwnews
Two Supreme Court candidates bounced from ballot | NW News Network
Two candidates for the Washington Supreme Court have been disqualified from appearing on the November ballot. Hugh Spitzer, professor of law at the UW, is interviewed.
Spitzer.Hugh  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  NW.News.Network  regl 
16 days ago by uwnews
What SCOTUS' wedding cake ruling means for Northwest | KUOW
The U.S. Supreme Court issued a narrowly focused ruling Monday that favored Masterpiece Cakes, a Colorado bakery, which refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. Peter Nicolas, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Nicolas.Peter  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  KUOW 
17 days ago by uwnews
Charlottesville hate marcher elected by Republican Party | The Daily Beast
An affiliate of a “pro-white” group who marched in Charlottesville last year was elected to a Republican Party post in Washington state last week. Hugh Spitzer, a professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Spitzer.Hugh  !UWitM  2018  natl  Daily.Beast  School:Law 
17 days ago by uwnews
Slim chance of Amazon's Echo device sharing private conversations | KUOW
Ryan Calo, director of the Tech Policy Lab at the UW and associate professor of law, is interviewed about the recent glitch involving an Amazon Echo device.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  KUOW  !UWitM  2018  regl  amazon  radio 
22 days ago by uwnews
The Supreme Court is stubbornly analog — by design | FiveThirtyEight
The Supreme Court is an openly — even proudly — technophobic institution. Ryan Calo, an associate professor in the UW School of Law, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Five.Thirty.Eight 
24 days ago by uwnews
Amazon's Alexa eavesdropped and shared the chat, report says | Bloomberg
Amazon said a series of miscues picked up by one of its voice-activated Echo speakers during an Oregon couple’s private conversation resulted in the chat being recorded and sent to one of their acquaintances without their knowledge. Ryan Calo, an associate professor in the UW School of Law, is quoted. [Note: This story appeared in multiple outlets]
Bloomberg  !UWitM  2018  natl  School:Law  Calo.Ryan 
24 days ago by uwnews
Amazon: Alexa Echo sent recorded conversation in 'unlikely' string of events | CBS News
An "unlikely" string of events prompted Amazon's Echo personal assistant device to record a Portland, Oregon, family's private conversation and then sent the recording to an acquaintance in Seattle, the company said Thursday. Ryan Calo, an associate professor at the UW School of Law, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  CBS.News 
24 days ago by uwnews
Local government officials may be barred from blocking Twitter critics | The Spokesman-Review
A federal court ruling in a case involving President Donald Trump and his Twitter account could affect state and local officials throughout the country. Bob Gomulkiewicz, a professor at the UW School of Law, is quoted.
Spokesman.Review  !UWitM  2018  regl  Gomulkiewicz.Bob  School:Law 
24 days ago by uwnews
Monday's Supreme Court decision: A 'license to break the law'? | KUOW
A 5-4 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the ability of employers to force employees into individual arbitration. UW law professor Eric Schnapper is interviewed.
KUOW  !UWitM  2018  regl  Schnapper.Eric  School:Law 
4 weeks ago by uwnews
Can King County win its lawsuit against big oil? | Seattle Weekly
On May 9, King County filed a suit against five major oil companies — Royal Dutch Shell, ExxonMobil, BP, Chevron, and ConocoPhillips — alleging that the corporations knew about the impacts of fossil fuels on climate change, but downplayed them to the public. Hugh Spitzer, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Spitzer.Hugh  !UWitM  2018  regl  Seattle.Weekly  School:Law 
5 weeks ago by uwnews
Anatomy of an insanity defense: Attorneys failed to convince jurors that mental illness was major factor in homicides | The Yakima Herald
Despite their attorneys arguing that they suffer from mental illness, Manuel Enrique Verduzco Jr. and Santiago Santos were sentenced to prison at the conclusion of two recent high-profile murder trials in Yakima. Helen Anderson, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Anderson.Helen  Yakima.Herald  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law 
5 weeks ago by uwnews
UW students rally for alum's release from Iranian prison | KING 5
The University of Washington Jackson School for International Studies held a rally Tuesday calling for the release of Xiyue Wang from an Iranian prison.
KING  regl  !UWitM  2018  Jackson.School.International.Studies  College:Arts&Sciences  School:Law  Center.Human.Rights 
5 weeks ago by uwnews
Editorial | Accusing Amazon of a felony shows skewed logic | The Seattle Times
"The labor-backed group Working Washington urges the state’s attorney general to prosecute Amazon for “intimidating a public servant,” a class B felony," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Hugh Spitzer, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Spitzer.Hugh  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  Seattle.Times  regl 
5 weeks ago by uwnews
Google's artificial intelligence can pass as human — should it be required to tell people it's a machine? | The Washington Post
Google's unveiling of Duplex, an automated voice assistant, has thrown a spotlight on how advanced AI can now carry on conversations that are so lifelike that even a human listener can be fooled. Madeline Lamo, a University of Washington law student researching robotic harms and free speech, is quoted.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Washington.Post  Lamo.Madeline  Artificial.Intelligence 
6 weeks ago by uwnews
Opinion | ‘Blurred Lines’ ruling brings justice to composers like Marvin Gaye | The Seattle Times
A recent federal appellate court ruling that Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke infringed on a famous Marvin Gaye song serves to endorse audio recordings as evidence of the compositions of “aural” composers who do not use European-based sheet music. This advances social justice for songwriters from disadvantaged backgrounds, write UW law professor Sean O'Connor and his Howard University colleagues, Lateef Mtima and Steven Jamar.
O'Connor.Sean  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  Seattle.Times  regl  opinion.analysis 
6 weeks ago by uwnews
Should the government regulate artificial intelligence? | WSJ
Artificial intelligence brings tremendous opportunity for business and society. But it has also created fear that letting computers make decisions could cause serious problems that might need to be addressed sooner rather than later. Ryan Calo, an associate law professor at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Wall.Street.Journal 
7 weeks ago by uwnews
Rod Rosenstein: Justice Department 'not going to be extorted' by threats | USA Today
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told a Law Day audience Tuesday that the Justice Department won't be intimidated by critics as it supervises ongoing investigations. Ronald Collins, a constitutional law expert at the UW, is quoted.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  USA.Today  Collins.Ronald  natl 
7 weeks ago by uwnews
Serial killer found through DNA website | Q13
Law enforcement found the so-called Golden State Killer by searching a DNA database from a family tree website. Mary Fan, professor of law at the UW, is interviewed.
Q13  !UWitM  2018  regl  video  Fan.Mary  School:Law  genetics&dna 
7 weeks ago by uwnews
Supreme Court considers Trump's travel ban | KUOW
Bill Radke talks to Lisa Manheim, associate professor at the University of Washington School of Law, about what arguments were presented in front of the Supreme Court on Wednesday in favor and against President Trump's travel ban.
KUOW  regl  !UWitM  2018  Manheim.Lisa  School:Law 
8 weeks ago by uwnews
Tribes take Washington to Supreme Court over salmon-blocking culverts | KUOW
Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professor Robert Anderson about a U.S. Supreme Court case involving Native American fishing rights in Washington state. At issue is whether Washington state should pay to fix culverts, which block the passage of salmon.
Anderson.Robert  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  KUOW 
9 weeks ago by uwnews
Self-driving cars, thinking machines will test limits of tort law | Forbes
Self-driving cars, machines that teach themselves how to operate and home digital assistants that can enter into legally binding contracts are all either on the market now or soon will be. So the next question is: Whom do you sue when they run amok? Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  Forbes  natl 
9 weeks ago by uwnews
Supreme Court showdown: Washington’s attorney general vs. tribes over salmon habitat | The Seattle Times
A 20-year battle over salmon-blocking road culverts lands in the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday, in a historic showdown pitting the Washington state attorney general against the U.S. government and Washington tribes defending their treaty right to fish. Bob Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the UW, is quoted.
Anderson.Robert  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  Native.American.Law.Center  regl  Seattle.Times 
9 weeks ago by uwnews
AI is an excuse for Facebook to keep messing up | The Verge
Artificial intelligence is a broad umbrella term that can include automation of all varieties, machine learning, or even more specifically deep learning. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  The.Verge  natl 
9 weeks ago by uwnews
AI will solve Facebook’s most vexing problems, Mark Zuckerberg says — just don’t ask when or how | The Washington Post
Artificial intelligence will solve Facebook’s most vexing problems, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg insists. He just can’t say when, or how. Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  Washington.Post  natl 
10 weeks ago by uwnews
‘Seismic shift’: New law will reduce number of juveniles sent to adult court in Washington state | The Seattle Times
A new law will reduce the number of 16- and 17-year-olds who have been charged with a handful of violent offenses from entering the adult criminal-justice system. Kim Ambrose, a senior lecturer of law at the UW, is quoted.
Ambrose.Kimberly  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Seattle.Times 
11 weeks ago by uwnews
New dean named for UW law school | The Seattle Times
Mario Barnes, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, will become the University of Washington law school’s dean.
Seattle.Times  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law  Barnes.Mario 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
UW law announces addition of Mario L. Barnes as dean | JD Journal
Mario L. Barnes is set to join the University of Washington School of Law as the new dean.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  Barnes.Mario  regl  JD.Journal 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
A fight over salmon-killing roads is now a Supreme Court case about Native rights | KUOW
Culverts — stream-carrying pipes that run under roads — can keep salmon from swimming upstream to spawn. Robert Anderson, a tribal law professor at the UW, is quoted.
Anderson.Robert  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  KUOW  regl 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
Is tricking a robot the same thing as hacking it? | Quartz
A team of computer scientists and a lawyer at University of Washington are raising a curious question: Do current US laws cover cutting-edge research that allows people to bend AI to their will? The UW's Ryan Calo, associate professor of law, and Tadayoshi Kohno, professor of computer science and engineering, are quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Quartz  Kohno.Tadayoshi  College:Engineering  Allen.School 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
Franklin County officials are lawyering up to square off. And you’re going to pay for it | Yakima Herald
Franklin County taxpayers can expect to pay thousands of dollars in legal bills in the case pitting Tri-City judges against the county clerk. Hugh Spitzer, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Spitzer.Hugh  !UWitM  2018  regl  Yakima.Herald  School:Law 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
The Hoodwitch accuses Starbucks of ripping her off | The Stranger
Bri Luna, the creator of The Hoodwitch, a Seattle-based online retail story and community, is accusing Starbucks of ripping off her image with its new crystal ball frappuccino. Zahr Said, a professor of intellectual property and copyright law and the UW, is quoted.
Said.Zahr  The.Stranger  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
Opinion | Now are you ready to safeguard your personal data? | The Seattle Times
"Facebook’s data leak has shocked many people regarding the vulnerability of user data, yet this type of privacy breach should not surprise those who have paid attention to the growth of social networks in the age of Big Data," writes Alex Alben, an instructor at the UW's Tech Policy Law Clinic.
opinion.analysis  !UWitM  2018  Seattle.Times  School:Law  Alben.Alex  Tech.Policy.Lab  regl 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
Uber crash shows 'catastrophic failure' of self-driving technology, experts say | The Guardian
Video of the first self-driving car crash that killed a pedestrian suggests a “catastrophic failure” by Uber’s technology, according to experts in the field, who said the footage showed the autonomous system erring on one of its most basic functions. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
The.Guardian  !UWitM  2018  Calo.Ryan  School:Law  natl 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
Should we pay for Facebook? ‘Something needs to change’ to resolve data privacy tension | GeekWire
Many of us pay a monthly or annual fee for Netflix, Spotify, Amazon Prime and other online services. So why not pay for Facebook? Ryan Calo, associate professor at the University of Washington School of Law, is quoted.
GeekWire  Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl 
12 weeks ago by uwnews
'Uber should be shut down': friends of self-driving car crash victim seek justice | The Guardian
Loved ones are in shock over the death of Elaine Herzberg in Arizona, but questions remain as to whether Uber will be held accountable. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  natl  School:Law  The.Guardian 
march 2018 by uwnews
What Uber’s fatal accident could mean for the autonomous-car industry | MIT Technology Review
The first pedestrian death by an autonomous car is leading some experts to ask whether the industry is moving too fast to deploy the technology. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  natl  MIT.Technology.Review  School:Law 
march 2018 by uwnews
Are we doing enough to stop a hack? | KOMO Radio
David Kris, a lecturer of law at the UW, is interviewed about whether the U.S. government is doing enough to stop another potential hack of the country's election system.
KOMO  radio  !UWitM  2018  regl  Kris.David  School:Law 
march 2018 by uwnews
Artificial intelligence rules more of your life — who rules AI? | WSJ
Tech companies are working on standards for the field of artificial intelligence. Although, critics see their efforts as attempts to stave off government oversight. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  Wall.Street.Journal  natl  Artificial.Intelligence 
march 2018 by uwnews
In Washington, there’s a low-cost alternative to hiring (or becoming) a lawyer | The Seattle Times
Washington lawyers are trying to get the word out about a new type of legal license that has begun to give non-lawyers the ability to practice certain types of law in this state. The UW's Continuing Education Program and the UW School of Law are mentioned.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Seattle.Times  Continuum.College 
march 2018 by uwnews
Federal government power | KIRO Radio
Kathryn Watts, a UW law professor, is interviewed about the power of the federal government on issues involving marijuana and immigration.
radio  !UWitM  2018  KIRO  regl  Watts.Kathryn  School:Law 
february 2018 by uwnews
Washington state lawmakers make speedy move to shield their records from the public | The Seattle Times
With no debate, the Washington state House and Senate approved a bill Friday that makes some legislative records public starting in July — but shields records that already exist. Hugh Spitzer, a law professor at the UW, is quoted.
Spitzer.Hugh  !UWitM  2018  Seattle.Times  regl  waleg  School:Law 
february 2018 by uwnews
Autopilot: Is Seattle ready for self-driving cars? | Seattle Magazine
Kirkland is one of the few U.S. cities where self-driving cars are being tested. How else are state and local leaders preparing? Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Seattle.Magazine  !UWitM  2018  regl  Calo.Ryan  School:Law 
february 2018 by uwnews
UW law professors outline the limits of presidential power | KNKX
Since the election of President Donald Trump, question after question has emerged about presidential power and the potential checks on those powers. There were so many questions that two UW law professors, Kathryn Watts and Lisa Manheim, quickly put together a class on the subject last winter.
KNKX  Watts.Kathryn  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law  Manheim.Lisa 
february 2018 by uwnews
Editorial | Open records are in the public’s best interest | The Seattle Times
"There are legitimate concerns about privacy and identity theft. But they do not and should not justify the sweeping closure of public records that the Washington Legislature is now considering," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Seattle.Times 
february 2018 by uwnews
Is Washington weed crossing borders? Conditions are right, some say | The Seattle Times
For more than three months, the state has been using hundreds of thousands of spreadsheets to track its marijuana system. Meanwhile, a gram of wholesale pot costs less than a gallon of milk at the grocery store, and Idaho state police are confiscating more border-crossing pot. Sam Méndez, former executive director of the UW's Cannabis Law & Policy Project, is quoted.
Seattle.Times  !UWitM  2018  regl  marijuana  Mendez.Sam  Cannabis.Law&Policy.Project  School:Law 
february 2018 by uwnews
Weinstein suit may be turning point, experts say: 'They'll bring him down’ | The Guardian
A new civil rights case filed by New York’s top prosecutor presents perhaps the biggest threat yet to Harvey Weinstein and his former film production company. Mary Fan, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Fan.Mary  !UWitM  2018  The.Guardian  School:Law  natl 
february 2018 by uwnews
Campaign aims to end disenrollment in tribes: ‘People have to belong’ | KUOW
The #stopdisenrollment campaign re-launched Thursday, aimed at getting Native American tribes to stop kicking out members. Eric Eberhard, affiliate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Eberhard.Eric  KUOW  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law 
february 2018 by uwnews
'The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law' | Washington Independent Review of Books
Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts, law professors at the University of Washington in Seattle, have chosen the first year of Donald Trump's semiautocratic presidency to provide a primer on presidential limits.
Washington.Independent.Review.Books  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  Manheim.Lisa  Watts.Kathryn  natl 
february 2018 by uwnews
Opinion | It’s up to Congress, not the president, to fix DACA | The Seattle Times
"Regardless of whether Congress agrees to act on Trump’s proposals, one casualty of the past few years of legal and political churn is clear: faith in our democratic institutions of government," writes Kathryn Watts, UW professor of law.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  Seattle.Times  opinion.analysis  Watts.Kathryn  politics  regl 
february 2018 by uwnews
To thwart federal pot laws, cannabis sellers find an ally in fights over gun rights, Obamacare | KIRO 7
It’s been a nervous business from the get-go, Jerina Pillert said. The decision to sell marijuana for a living means existing between what’s locally sanctioned and nationally forbidden, between persistent customer demand and a skittish finance industry. Hugh Spitzer, a law professor at the UW, is quoted.
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  KIRO  Spitzer.Hugh  marijuana  regl 
february 2018 by uwnews
How much power does the president have? | KUOW
KUOW interviews UW law professors Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts about President Donald Trump's time in office so far and how he has used his power as the president. Watts and Manheim co-authored a new book, "The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law."
Watts.Kathryn  Manheim.Lisa  !UWitM  2018  regl  radio  KUOW  School:Law 
january 2018 by uwnews
Taxes: What tax reform means to Goldman Sachs | Fortune
Confused about the new tax law? Join the crowd. The tax reforms are having wildly different impacts on different companies–and no company illustrates those discrepancies better than Wall Street titan Goldman Sachs. Jeffery Kadet, affiliate instructor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Kadet.Jeffery  !UWitM  2018  natl  Fortune  School:Law 
january 2018 by uwnews
Can Trump really do that? UW profs look at presidential power | Crosscut
Responding to the post-election groundswell of interest in presidential authority, two University of Washington law professors, Kathryn Watts and Lisa Manheim — both former clerks to U.S. Supreme Court justices — have written an authoritative citizen’s guide: “The Limits of Presidential Power.”
School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Manheim.Lisa  Watts.Kathryn  politics  Crosscut 
january 2018 by uwnews
Opinion | Can the president really do that? | YES! Magazine
"(The) fixation on the president — on his campaign promises, his tweets, his executive orders — is understandable. Yet focusing too narrowly on the president threatens to exaggerate the president’s power," write UW law professors Kathryn Watts and Lisa Manheim.
opinion.analysis  !UWitM  2018  YES.Magazine  Watts.Kathryn  School:Law  Manheim.Lisa  regl 
january 2018 by uwnews
Amazon Go: No checkouts, but you are being watched | KUOW
Nobody likes to wait in line. So today, Amazon removed that unpleasantness from the neighborhood grocery store. At Amazon Go, you walk in, pick up your groceries and walk out. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is interviewed.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  regl  KUOW  amazon 
january 2018 by uwnews
Someday you could get sued for sexually harassing your robot employees | Inc.com
Granting robots rights, or legal protections, is less about the fair treatment of robots and more about how the treatment of robots reflects upon the human race. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Inc  robots 
january 2018 by uwnews
New book on presidential power | KING 5
Kathryn Watts, UW professor of law, is interviewed on KING 5's "New Day Northwest" about a new book she has co-authored with UW law professor Lisa Manheim titled, "The Limits of Presidential Power."
KING  Watts.Kathryn  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  video 
january 2018 by uwnews
Opinion | The Constitution has stopped Trump — so far | CNN
"Donald Trump, as a presidential candidate, never promised compromise. He instead promised the opposite: reform through sheer force of will," writes Lisa Manheim, associate professor of law at the UW.
Manheim.Lisa  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  CNN  opinion.analysis 
january 2018 by uwnews
Starbucks’ cashless cafe stirs up question — shouldn’t retailers have to accept ‘legal tender’? | The Seattle Times
It’s just a one-store test, but news that Starbucks is experimenting with refusing cash at its location in Seattle’s Russell Investment Center has certainly stirred up discussion. Many readers had the same reaction to the policy that was quietly implemented Tuesday: Isn’t that illegal? Jane Winn, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Winn.Jane  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  regl  Seattle.Times 
january 2018 by uwnews
What can the president do? | KOMO Radio
Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts, UW law professors, were interviewed by KOMO Radio about their new book, "The Limits of Presidential Power."
Manheim.Lisa  Watts.Kathryn  School:Law  radio  KOMO  regl  !UWitM  2018 
january 2018 by uwnews
Activist Maru Mora-Villalpando says ICE using deportation threat as ‘intimidation tactic’ | The Seattle Times
Activist Maru Mora-Villalpando, an undocumented immigrant, says federal immigration officials are using an “intimidation tactic” by putting her into deportation proceedings. Alejandra Gonza, director of the UW's International Human Rights Clinic, is quoted.
Gonza.Alejandra  International.Human.Rights.Clinic  School:Law  Seattle.Times  !UWitM  2018  regl 
january 2018 by uwnews
“I am not going to stop,” pledges local immigration activist targeted by ICE | The Stranger
Maru Mora, a local immigration activist who faces deportation, spoke in front of ICE's Seattle office today alongside her daughter and supporters. Angélica Cházaro, assistant professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
The.Stranger  Chazaro.Angelica  School:Law  regl  !UWitM  2018 
january 2018 by uwnews
What's the limit of presidential powers? New book by UW profs has answers | KING 5
After the wild popularity of their course on executive power, UW law professors Kathryn Watts and Lisa Manheim co-authored a book titled "The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law."
Watts.Kathryn  Manheim.Lisa  KING  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law 
january 2018 by uwnews
Pennsylvania could be on the verge of dealing partisan gerrymandering a big blow | HuffPost
Pennsylvania’s highest court could be on the verge of setting unprecedented limits on how much politicians can redraw electoral districts to their party’s advantage. Lisa Manheim, a UW law professor, is quoted.
Manheim.Lisa  !UWitM  2018  natl  Huffington.Post  School:Law 
january 2018 by uwnews
Big Brother on wheels: Why your car company may know more about you than your spouse | The Washington Post
Daniel Dunn was about to sign a lease for a Honda Fit last year when a detail buried in the lengthy agreement caught his eye. Honda wanted to track the location of his vehicle, the contract stated, according to Dunn. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  !UWitM  2018  School:Law  natl  Washington.Post 
january 2018 by uwnews
Uber used a secret tool for keeping the authorities in the dark | MSN
At least two dozen times, the San Francisco headquarters of Uber locked down equipment in foreign offices to shield files from police raids. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
!UWitM  2018  natl  MSN  School:Law  Calo.Ryan 
january 2018 by uwnews
Department of Justice rescinds Obama-era policy on marijuana | Wisconsin Public Radio
Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced in a memo last week that he will revoke a set of Obama-era policies that discouraged federal prosecutors from enforcing federal marijuana laws in states that had legalized the drug. Sean O'Connor, professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
O'Connor.Sean  Wisconsin.Public.Radio  !UWitM  2018  regl  School:Law  marijuana  Cannabis.Law&Policy.Project 
january 2018 by uwnews
US border guards searched 60 percent more devices in 2017 | Engadget
In 2017, the US Customs and Border Protection searched 30,200 electronic devices. That's over 60 percent the number of searches its personnel conducted the year before to the dismay of privacy advocates. Ryan Calo, associate professor of law at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  School:Law  !UWitM  2018  natl  Engadget 
january 2018 by uwnews
Justice Department's policy shift may slow booming pot industry | NBC News
America’s marijuana industry, already threading a thicket of conflicting state and federal laws, entered a new era of uncertainty this week when the Justice Department scrapped a policy that allowed pot to flourish in states that legalized it. Sean O'Connor, who runs the Cannabis Law and Policy Project at the UW, is quoted.
O'Connor.Sean  School:Law  Cannabis.Law&Policy.Project  marijuana  NBC.News  natl  !UWitM  2018 
january 2018 by uwnews
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